Undergraduate Courses

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Art (AR)

AR-111 - Drawing I

An introduction to observational drawing. Development of a personal vision and an individual style through an exploration of the expressive means of drawing: form, line, texture, composition. Various tools and techniques. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-113 - Three-Dimensional Design

Provides an analytical approach to design elements and principles with an emphasis on spatial organization and three-dimensional forms using a variety of materials and techniques. This course investigates numerous approaches to understanding the visual world. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-114 - Graphic Design I

An introduction to page layout and design as it relates to constructed documents including books, posters, and brochures. Provides an overview of the field of commercial art including advertising, web design, and art direction. 3 credits

AR-122 - Two-Dimensional Design

An introduction to the elements of two-dimensional design and study of visual language principles used to organize the plane. Projects are geared to solving visual "problems" with an eye toward elegant and economical solutions. This course will be conducted using the computer as the primary tool and investigating numerous approaches to understanding the visual world. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-139 - Introduction to Digital Video & Audio

This course focuses on concepts and techniques associated with digital video production with a focus on internet distribution. Topics include introductory video production and post-production principles, introductory animation principles, documentary best-practices, pre-production planning, and both on-location and studio production. Through a combination of planned location shoots, group projects, and individual creative production students will be exposed to principles and practices associated with both field and studio production. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-201 - Introduction to Computer Art

An introduction to imaging using windows based tools. The course explores digital bit mapped and vector systems to create two-dimensional works for paper and the web. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-211 - Drawing II

A continuation of AR 111 with an emphasis on development of a personal style and drawing as communication and expression. P: AR 111. 3 credits

AR-212 - Figure Drawing

Figure Drawing is an advanced drawing course. Students enrolled should already have developed a competency in the technical aspects of observational drawing. This course is an introduction to the skills and concepts associated with drawing the nude and clothed human form through creative studio and homework projects. P: AR 111. 3 credits

AR-213 - Color

This course includes projects analyzing the physical and psychological aspects of color in painting and design with emphasis on theories of color interaction. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-214 - Graphic Design II

A continuation of AR 114 with a focus on typography, layout, and design for commercial publication. Type specification, production techniques, and digital design tools will be surveyed. The course culminates with a portfolio of publication-ready design. P: AR 114. 3 credits

AR-216 - Arts and Entrepreneurship

This course introduces students to a variety for students in creative fields within their individual practices, providing business skills, tools, and resources to enable future achievement of their creative goals with an emphasis on professional practice. This course will focus on creating new, self-driven opportunities for creative production. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-218 - Introduction to Digital Game Development

This studio course will introduce students to the primary concepts of game-making in a digital age, examining games as an emergent art form. Students will replicate historic games using contemporary digital tools and produce both physical and digital game elements. Students will study the development and impact of games as interactive art. General Education: A. 3 credits

AR-231 - Introduction to Ceramics

Study of the formal elements of shape, volume, color, and texture as they relate to clay and glazes; important historical and contemporary examples; techniques in handling clay, especially hand-building. 3 credits

AR-232 - Ceramics II

A continuation of AR 231 with more emphasis on various ways of finishing, glazing, and firing hand built as well as wheel thrown clay. P: AR 231. 3 credits

AR-235 - Introduction to Photography I

Introduces students to the fine art and craft of photography and photographic printmaking. Instruction in camera and darkroom techniques leads to a portfolio with emphasis on visual thinking and photographic seeing. 3 credits

AR-236 - Photography II

A continuation of AR 235, Photography II develops a personal approach to photography and solving formal and technical problems. P: AR 235. 3 credits

AR-239 - Digital Video & Audio I

A continuation of AR/CO 139, this course provides support for students to develop and complete an intermediate project using digital video and audio tools. Students will carry individual projects through pre-production, production, post-production and distribution. Students will further be required to assist with the productions of their peers. P: AR 139 or CO 139. 3 credits

AR-243 - Motion Graphics & Visual Effects I

This course builds on the post-production skills introduced in AR/CO 139 developing motion graphics and compositing visual effects for digital, time-based productions. Students will study the history of visual effects and motion graphics technology, contemporary and historic time-based works, and develop original animated content. P: AR 139 or CO 239. 3 credits

AR-244 - Motion Graphics & Visual Effects II

This course builds on the post-production skills introduced in AR/CO 243 and allows for students to develop advanced works of digital animation. If offered simultaneously with Digital Video I or II, this course may further support the significant development of motion graphics or visual effects for peers' productions in those courses. P: AR 243 or CO 243. 3 credits

AR-252 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within an Art frame of reference. 3 credits

AR-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within an Art frame of reference. 3 credits

AR-311 - Painting I

An introduction to various techniques and approaches to painting with acrylic and/or oils. Regular critiques, gallery visits. P: AR 111, AR 213 or permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

AR-312 - Painting II

An advanced course in painting. Students will develop their personal style through an in-depth approach toward technical and conceptual problems. P: AR 311. 3 credits

AR-313 - Advanced Painting III

This course provides the student with the opportunity to explore advanced technical and conceptual work in painting. It allows the student to create one or two thematically linked bodies of work which will be accompanied by supporting research, a written proposal and an Artist's Statement. Students are mentored in the development of an "interview ready" portfolio/binder and other career preparation materials. P: AR 311, AR 312. 3 credits

AR-314 - Advanced Graphic Design I

Introduction to design for the World Wide Web. Students will create a professional portfolio site for themselves and take it live to the web with their own domain name. P: AR 214. 3 credits

AR-315 - Advanced Graphic Design II

A semester in company identity and package design. Design to meet the strategic needs of corporate branding and packaging. P: AR 314. 3 credits

AR-331 - Advanced Ceramics I

An opportunity for further work at advanced levels in the medium. P: AR 231, AR 232. 3 credits

AR-332 - Advanced Ceramics II

An opportunity for further work at advanced levels in the medium. P: AR 231, AR 232, AR 331. 3 credits

AR-335 - Digital Photography I

An exploration of photographic color, light, and design using digital tools. Coursework includes scanning into digital image from conventional film. Adobe Photoshop software is utilized to manipulate, edit, collage, and combine digital images. 3 credits

AR-336 - Digital Photography II

An opportunity to explore advanced coursework in digital photographic editing. Students will pursue a defined project throughout the semester. P: AR 335. 3 credits

AR-337 - Advanced Photography I

An opportunity for motivated students to pursue more advanced work in still photography including color and large format work. P: AR 235, AR 236. 3 credits

AR-338 - Advanced Photography II

An opportunity for motivated students to pursue more advanced work in still photography including color and large format work. P: AR 235, AR 236, AR 337. 3 credits

AR-339 - Digital Video & Audio II

A continuation of AR/CO 239, this course provides support for students to develop and complete an advanced project using digital video and/or audio tools. Students will carry individual projects through pre-production, production, post-production and distribution. Students will further be required to assist with the productions of their peers. P: AR 239 or CO 239. 3 credits

AR-355 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within an Art frame of reference. 3 credits

AR-356 - 3D Modelling and Animation I

Students will explore 3D techniques such as modeling, motion, transformation, lighting, and texturing in the creation of original assets, virtual worlds, and animations. Students will strengthen their individual artistic voice while creating assets for either time-based or interactive creative works. 3 credits.

AR-357 - 3D Modelling & Animation II

A continuation of AR 356, 3D Modelling & Animation II provides an opportunity for students to pursue a singular time-based project or, if taken in conjunction with AR 360 or 361, develop original assets for an interactive project. Students will more deeply research and develop their abilities with 3D character design, environmental design, virtual lighting, model rigging, and animation. P: AR 356. 3 credits

AR-360 - Digital Game Development I

Digital Game Development I builds upon the foundations of the introduction course and gives the student the opportunity, time, resources, and faculty support to build individual games from conception to playable prototype. P: AR 218. 3 credits

AR-361 - Digital Game Development II

A continuation of AR 360, Game Development II allows the student to complete a more finished version of their work from that previous class. Game Development II will further offer a foundation in distributing platforms and marketing practices. P: AR 218, AR 360. 3 credits

AR-380 - Art Practicum

Program of supervised practical experience in museum, gallery, art, or advertising studio related to the student's course of study in art. P: Permission of Department Chair. 2-12 credits

AR-381 - Internship: Art Management

This is a field based course in which students gain on site experience working in the Art and/or Art Management field for 120 contact hours per 3 credits. The student is responsible for maintaining an integrative journal and completing other academic requirements. A student may repeat this course only once, and the second internship must be at a different location. P: Junior or Senior standing. 3 to 12 credits

AR-390 - Special Problems in Art

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

AR-391 - Senior Project

Includes discussion of current writings on art and art criticism, and a studio project or research paper. Exhibition required of seniors concentrating in studio art; lecture or project required of those concentrating in the history of art. P: Open to Senior Art majors. 3 credits

Art History (AH)

AH-143 - Evolution of Art: Ideas and Practice

This is an art history survey course which encourages active learning through creative studio projects, research, collaborative discussion and problem solving. The course will examine a selection of major visual art forms in various cultures and time periods ranging from the ancient to the contemporary. General Education: A. 3 credits

AH-230 - Art History Survey I

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Western World from prehistory to the Late Gothic. This course investigates aesthetic and technical developments in art and architecture and their relationship to the social, political, and cultural growth of Western civilization. It is designed to introduce students to new perspectives through the visual language of art history (Prehistoric, Ancient Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Medieval, and Islamic influences on the development of Romanesque and Gothic). General Education: A. 3 credits

AH-230W - Art History Survey I

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Western World from prehistory to the Late Gothic. This course investigates aesthetic and technical developments in art and architecture and their relationship to the social, political, and cultural growth of Western civilization. It is designed to introduce students to new perspectives through the visual language of art history (Prehistoric, Ancient Egyptian, Greek, Roman, Medieval, and Islamic influences on the development of Romanesque and Gothic). General Education: A. 3 credits

AH-231 - Art History Survey II

A continuation of Art History I, the survey of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 14th century Renaissance to 19th century Neo-Classicism (Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Romanticism, Neoclassicism). General Education: A. 3 credits

AH-231W - History of Art II

A continuation of Art History I, the survey of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 14th century Renaissance to 19th century Neo-Classicism (Renaissance, Baroque, Rococo, Romanticism, Neoclassicism). General Education: A. 3 credits

AH-232 - Art History Survey III

A continuation of Art History II, the survey of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture from 19th century Realism and Impressionism to the major modernist and postmodernist movements of the 20th-21st century (Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, Cubism, Futurism, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, Op, Minimalism to the New Genre of Today). General Education: A. 3 credits

AH-321 - Modern Art and Architecture

This course introduces students to the Modernist movement in art and architecture and the currents that came after it. Capitalizing on our proximity to fine examples of Modern art and architecture in New Haven, students are given opportunities to learn beyond the classroom. Visual art movements covered include impressionism, expressionism, Dada, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, conceptual art, minimalism, Earthwork, site-specific art, and video art. In architecture, students become acquainted with Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the Bauhaus, the International Style, Postmodern innovators from Phillip Johnson and Frank Gehry, and recent artists who cross boundaries between art and architecture, such as Olalekan Jeyifous and Patricia Johanson. Aesthetic tropes are examined and evaluated, including realism, disorder, fragmentation, the sublime, irony, pastiche, surface, depth, ruins, and everydayness. As an interdisciplinary course bridging Art History and Philosophy students are also introduced to theorists of art, culture, and architecture who have not only observed these movements, but in some cases shaped them. They range from Charles Baudelaire and Freidrich Nietzsche to Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Frederic Jameson, Jean Baudrillard, Jean Francois Lyotard, Robert Venturi, Charles Jencks, and others. General Education: C. 3 credits

AH-321W - Modern Art and Architecture

This course introduces students to the Modernist movement in art and architecture and the currents that came after it. Capitalizing on our proximity to fine examples of Modern art and architecture in New Haven, students are given opportunities to learn beyond the classroom. Visual art movements covered include impressionism, expressionism, Dada, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, conceptual art, minimalism, Earthwork, site-specific art, and video art. In architecture, students become acquainted with Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the Bauhaus, the International Style, Postmodern innovators from Phillip Johnson and Frank Gehry, and recent artists who cross boundaries between art and architecture, such as Olalekan Jeyifous and Patricia Johanson. Aesthetic tropes are examined and evaluated, including realism, disorder, fragmentation, the sublime, irony, pastiche, surface, depth, ruins, and everydayness. As an interdisciplinary course bridging Art History and Philosophy students are also introduced to theorists of art, culture, and architecture who have not only observed these movements, but in some cases shaped them. They range from Charles Baudelaire and Freidrich Nietzsche to Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Frederic Jameson, Jean Baudrillard, Jean Francois Lyotard, Robert Venturi, Charles Jencks, and others. General Education: C. 3 credits

AH-351 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within an Art History frame of reference. 3 credits

AH-351W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within an Art History frame of reference. 3 credits

AH-380 - Art History Practicum

Program of supervised practical experience in museum, gallery, or arts administration related to the student's course of study in art history. P: Permission of Department Chair. 2-12 credits

AH-390 - Special Problems in Art History

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

Art Management (AM)

AM-111 - Introduction to Art Management

Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the theory and practice of art management in nonprofit and for-profit organizations. 3 credits

AM-129 - Art Space Management

This course is designed for students to study and to discover how spaces are managed as facilitators of the promotion of art to the community. 3 credits

AM-216 - Arts and Entrepreneurship

This course introduces students to a variety for students in creative fields within their individual practices, providing business skills, tools, and resources to enable future achievement of their creative goals with an emphasis on professional practice. This course will focus on creating new, self-driven opportunities for creative production. General Education: A. 3 credits

AM-315W - Nonprofit Fundraising and Introduction to Foundation Grant Writing

Through this course, students will gain insight into best practices in nonprofit fundraising, including an introduction into the world of foundation grant writing. Topics covered include: history of charitable giving, rationale for donor giving, legal and organizational aspects of a nonprofit corporation, Internal Revenue Code requirements related to charitable giving, creating a plan of development, creating as case statement, the donor cycle, and an introduction to private foundation grant research, writing, and submission. The course generally includes an experiential component in which students prepare and submit a grant application to a local foundation. 3 credits

AM-351 - Museum and Curatorial Studies

This course introduces students to the cultural role of museums and galleries, deepening their understanding of the intellectual and practical tasks of curating exhibitions and maintaining collections. Recent scholarship on the origins and functions of the museum will be studied. This course is ideal for students interested in careers in art-related fields, such as studio art, art history, arts management, and art education. 3 credits

AM-380 - Art Management Internship

Program of supervised practical experience in arts management in a field related to the student's course of study. P: AM 111 and AM 315W. 3 credits

Biology (BI)

BI-111 - General Biology I

The goal of this course is to familiarize the student with fundamental principles which govern all organisms. Topics introduced include biological themes illustrated throughout the semester, cell structure and physiology, Darwinian evolution, and genetics. To be taken in conjunction with BI 111L. General Education: A. 3 credits

BI-111L - General Biology I Laboratory

BI 111L uses a series of laboratory exercises designed to provide hands-on experience in addressing various biological principles and to introduce the scientific method of experimental design. To be taken in conjunction with BI 111. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI-112 - General Biology II

This course is a continuation of General Biology I with a comparative approach to various organ systems. What is an animal? What are the various modes of nutrition? What evolutionary steps have organisms made to become more efficient at surviving? What organ systems have they exploited? Their physiology, maintenance of homeostasis and the relationships the organ systems have to each other will be explored. To be taken in conjunction with BI 112L. 3 credits

BI-112L - General Biology II Laboratory

BI 112L explores the anatomy and physiology of selected organisms through dissection-based activities. To be taken in conjunction with BI 112. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI-116 - The Human Body

A non-majors course designed to provide a fundamental background in human biology and to serve as a basic introduction to the anatomy and physiology of humans. Emphasis is placed on examining the functions of various systems and their relationships to each other. Hands-on activities may be offered during the course giving the student a chance to experience the wonders of the human body for themselves. General Education: A. 3 credits

BI-205 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Biology frame of reference. 3 credits

BI-215 - Microbiology

This introductory-level course concentrates on fundamental functional and structural characteristics of microscopic organisms, bacteria, viruses, and lower eukaryotic species comprising the fungi, protozoa, and algae. Categorical features related to morphology, genetics, and metabolic processes will be studied. The course also highlights the importance of these groups of organisms as causative agents of infectious diseases and as powerful genetic tools in research. To be taken in conjunction with BI 215L. P: BI 111, BI 112. 3 credits

BI-215L - Microbiology Laboratory

Students gain experience in basic laboratory techniques that demonstrate the isolation and culturing of microbes, morphological traits of select microorganisms, and the exchange of genetic material between microbial cells. Biochemical assays that differentiate metabolic functions and enzymatic activities of bacterial and fungal species are introduced. The course provides training in the formatting and detailing of laboratory reports that review the experimental exercises. To be taken in conjunction with BI 215. P: BI 111, BI 112. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI-216 - Cell Biology

This course addresses life at the cellular level. Topics include the composition and physiology of major organelles, signal transduction, cancer, cell migration, and adhesion. To be taken in conjunction with BI 216L. P: BI 111. 3 credits

BI-216L - Cell Biology Laboratory

This course includes exercises employing methods commonly used in studying areas in cell biology. Laboratory techniques include DNA/protein electrophoresis, bacterial transformation, protein expression, and purification. To be taken in conjunction with BI 216. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI-310 - Genetics

This course is designed to introduce the student to DNA and its roles in the forming of genes, heredity, and the variation of organisms. Mendelian genetics, fundamental molecular genetics, and the genetic basis of evolution are included as well. To be taken in conjunction with BI 310L. P: BI 111, BI 112. 3 credits

BI-310L - Genetics Laboratory

Laboratory exercises include DNA/protein electrophoresis, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), restriction enzyme analysis and computer-based image analysis. To be taken in conjunction with BI 310. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI-316 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I

Part one of a two course sequence that explores the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a detailed analysis of the components and functions of the primary tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. To be taken in conjunction with BI 316L. 3 credits

BI-316L - Human Anatomy & Physiology I Laboratory

Laboratory periods involve hands-on coverage and analyses of the structures and functions of the primary tissues and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. To be taken in conjunction with BI 316. 3 hours. 1 credit

BI-317 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II

Part two of a two course sequence that explores the structure and function of the human body. Topics include the structures and functions of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, immune and reproductive systems. To be taken in conjunction with BI 317L. P: BI 316. 3 credits

BI-317L - Human Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory

Laboratory periods involve hands-on coverage and analyses of the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, immune and reproductive systems. To be taken in conjunction with BI 317. 3 hours. 1 credit

Business & Economics (BE)

BE-135 - Business Communications

This introductory course in written and oral communications will enable students to become more effective business communicators. Special focus is given to selecting and using visual aids and PowerPoint to enhance presentations. 3 credits

BE-135W - Business Communications

This introductory course in written and oral communications will enable students to become more effective business communicators. Special focus is given to selecting and using visual aids and PowerPoint to enhance presentations. 3 credits

BE-161 - Financial Accounting

In this introductory course, we will introduce students to accounting principles and procedures, and to the processes by which financial transactions are recorded, classified, and analyzed to help business decision-makers. Students will learn to prepare and interpret financial statements. 3 credits

BE-162 - Managerial Accounting

An introduction to the use of accounting information by managers. Topics include the use of accounting information for planning and control, performance evaluation, decision-making, and the statement of cash flows, as well as financial statement analysis. P: BE 161. 3 credits

BE-202 - Statistics for Business and Economics

Students will be introduced to the basic principles of statistical analysis that are useful in effective business decision-making. Some topics covered include descriptive statistics, probability and random events, sampling, and estimation. P: MA 111, MA 116, MA 120 or MA 121. 3 credits

BE-204 - Principles of Macroeconomics

Survey of introductory macroeconomics with a focus on economic growth, unemployment, and inflation. Topics covered include national income, fiscal policy, money, the banking system, and monetary policy. Balance of payments and currency exchange rate issues are analyzed. General Education: B. 3 credits

BE-205 - Principles of Microeconomics

Microeconomic concepts and tools will be utilized to evaluate the economic behavior of individuals. The "invisible" market forces (price mechanism) and external forces (social, cultural, political, and legal forces) will be explored and examined from personal perspectives as well as their aggregate effect on the economy. General Education: B. 3 credits

BE-220 - Personal Finance

This course is an examination of personal finance and the many tools available in the preparation of a personal financial plan. Areas of discussion include the following: banking, products and services offered by typical banks and credit unions, credit and credit repair, home finance and understanding various mortgages, financial planning including IRA and retirement planning, annuities, life insurance, long term care, making a will, estate planning and trusts, taxes, and an understanding of the role of stocks, bonds and mutual funds. 3 credits

BE-222 - International Finance

This course will cover topics applicable to global financial markets. Students will learn concepts pertaining to exchange rates, international currency flows, transaction exposure for multinational firms, interest rate differentials, country risk, and the international debt and equity markets. P: BE 161, BE 204. 3 credits

BE-225 - Money and Banking

In this course we will study monetary systems and the role of money and banks in supporting the economy. Topics will include the structure and operation of financial markets, the behavior of interest rates, the operation of the banking industry, and the structure of the Federal Reserve System. General Education: C. 3 credits

BE-227 - The Stock Market

As stock markets take on a more important role in the investment plans of individuals, it becomes essential to know the fundamentals of how Wall Street and other financial centers work. In this course we will examine the various types of securities traded on Wall Street, including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and futures and options. Students will also learn to understand financial news and to design and manage their own stock portfolios. 3 credits

BE-247 - Healthcare Finance

This course will provide an introduction to healthcare finance and the current financial environment in which healthcare organizations function. The course will expand on basic financial accounting concepts, explore financial concepts unique to healthcare, and examine techniques that lead to improved cost-effectiveness in a variety of healthcare organizations. The perspectives of various interest groups will be discussed: providers, insurers, policy makers, patients and the general public. P: BE 161. 3 credits

BE-248 - Business Modeling and Analysis

This course introduces the modern theory of entrepreneurship as a scientific method. Students learn formal business modeling and analysis methods, focused on the development of a financial and/or social impact model, and on the practice of business model validation. Each student builds and validates their own business idea in this course. P: BE 161, MG 131, MG 231. 3 credits

BE-251 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Business frame of reference. 3 credits

BE-251W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Business frame of reference. 3 credits

BE-261 - Intermediate Accounting I

Provides an intensive study of accounting theory as it relates to the measurement of assets, liabilities, and capital structure. Students will prepare and analyze detailed financial statements. P: BE 161, BE 162. 3 credits

BE-262 - Intermediate Accounting II

Provides an intensive study of accounting theory as it relates to the measurement of assets, liabilities, and capital structure. Students will prepare and analyze detailed financial statements. P: BE 261. 3 credits

BE-263 - Cost Accounting

In this course, we examine the theory and practice of cost accounting techniques and show how they are used in manufacturing businesses. Topics include job order, process costing, standard cost systems, and variance analysis. P: BE 161, BE 162. 3 credits

BE-265 - Corporate Financial Management

Students will study the financing, valuation, and organization of business firms. Topics include: financial analysis, capital budgeting, valuation of corporate assets, long and short-term sources of funding, and cost of capital. P: BE 162. 3 credits

BE-334 - Business Law

In this course, we study the basic legal principles that guide business relationships. Emphasis is placed on examination of the Uniform Commercial Code, contracts, sales, commercial paper, negotiable instruments, and business organizations. 3 credits

BE-334W - Business Law

In this course, we study the basic legal principles that guide business relationships. Emphasis is placed on examination of the Uniform Commercial Code, contracts, sales, commercial paper, negotiable instruments, and business organizations. 3 credits

BE-361 - Federal Income Taxation for Individuals

In this course, we study the theory and procedures of the Federal Income Tax System. Emphasis is placed on individual taxation using a forms-based approach. P: BE 162. 3 credits

BE-362 - Auditing

This course examines auditing concepts and procedures employed by public accountants for summarizing and analyzing the records and operations of business organizations. Students will use working papers and software programs to examine and evaluate transactions. P: BE 262. 3 credits

BE-363 - Advanced Accounting I

This course will cover the following advanced financial accounting topics: consolidated financial statements for corporations, entries for transactions denominated in foreign currencies, adjustments for market value changes in financial instruments, and accounting for partnerships. P: BE 262. 3 credits

BE-366 - Investment Analysis

This course will focus on advanced investment issues. Students will learn concepts pertaining to behavioral finance, technical and fundamental analysis, equity and bond valuation, portfolio management, professional money management, derivative securities, alternative investments, and portfolio analysis. P: BE 227, BE 265. 3 credits

BE-380 - Accounting Internship

This is a field-based course in which students gain on-site employment experience in a local accounting firm or accounting department of a business establishment for 120 contact hours per 3 credits. The student is responsible for maintaining an integrative journal and completing other academic requirements. P: 12 credits in accounting. 3-12 credits

BE-381 - Finance Internship

This is a field-based course in which students gain on-site employment experience in a local finance firm or finance department of a business establishment for 120 contact hours per 3 credits. The student is responsible for maintaining an integrative journal and completing other academic requirements. P: 12 credits in finance. 3-12 credits

BE-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

BE-394 - Accounting Theory in Practice

This course will provide an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills learned in previous courses in solving real world case problems. Students will complete a critical analysis of accounting, finance, and ethics problems. Through case studies, students will enhance their problem-solving skills by formulating solutions to problems that are encountered in accounting environments. 3 credits

BE-395 - Accounting Capstone

This course is designed to provide students the opportunity to utilize software programs currently being used in the industry. The course will be interactive with students working on the computer solving accounting problems. Accounting techniques learned in previous classes will be completed with a variety of software programs, including general ledger, audit, and tax packages, as well as Microsoft Excel. P: Senior status. 3 credits

Chemistry (CH)

CH-121 - General Chemistry I

A study of matter and atomic structure, measurements, mass-mole relationships, chemical nomenclature and composition, reaction stoichiometry, solution chemistry including acid-base, redox and precipitation reactions, the theory of gas laws, electronic structure and the Periodic table of elements, covalent bonding and related topics. To be taken in conjunction with CH 121L. P: Background in Mathematics equivalent to Algebra II. General Education: A. 3 credits

CH-121L - General Chemistry I Laboratory

General laboratory incorporating qualitative and quantitative techniques such as titrations, filtrations, basic statistics and graphing, mass-mole relationships, and chromatography will be included. To be taken in conjunction with CH 121. 3 hours. 1 credit

CH-122 - General Chemistry II

A study of liquids, solids and intermolecular bonding, concentration units and colligative properties, thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, equilibrium in chemical systems, acid and bases, acid-base theory and equilibria studies (including buffers and titrations), precipitation equilibria, coordination compounds, spontaneity of reactions, electrochemistry, and nuclear reactions (time permitting). To be taken in conjunction with CH 122L. P: CH 121. 3 credits

CH-122L - General Chemistry Laboratory II

Laboratory experiments include those related to empirical formulas and reaction stoichiometry. Others will be experiments utilizing basic analytical techniques: titrations, gravimetry, spectroscopy and electrochemistry. To be taken in conjunction with CH 122. 3 hours. 1 credit

CH-205 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Chemistry frame of reference. 3 credits

CH-207W - Chemistry of Nutrition

This course discusses nutrition and exercise, nutrition and the life cycle, and world nutrition grounded in basic chemical concepts such the atom, molecules, chemical reactivity and energy, as well as integrating fundamental biological concepts including cell structure and basic anatomy. Current social and health issues such the relation of nutrition to diabetes and other diseases, food technology and fad dieting will be incorporated throughout the course. 3 credits

CH-221L - Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

Introduction to various organic laboratory techniques including distillation, reflux, extractions, recrystallization, chromatography, qualitative analysis, and laboratory safety (and related matters). Experiments include paper and thin-layer chromatography, elimination, nucleophilic substitution, and addition reactions. To be taken in conjunction with CH 221W. P: CH 121, CH 122, CH 121L, CH 122, CH 122L. 3 hours. 1 credit

CH-221W - Organic Chemistry I

This course focuses on fundamentals of structure and bonding in organic compounds. Study of the structure, properties, preparation, reactions, and reaction mechanisms of organic compounds including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, and alkyl halides. Includes stereochemistry of organic compounds; plus detailed examination of the mechanisms of free radicals and nucleophilic substitution reactions. To be taken in conjunction with CH 221L. P: CH 121, CH 122. 3 credits

CH-222 - Organic Chemistry II

Study of the structure, properties, preparation, and reactions of organic compounds including alkadienes, arenes, organometallics, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amines, and various other derivative groups. Electrophilic aromatic substitution, Grignard, Fischer Esterification and other major organic reactions. Application of organic reactions using principles of retrosynthesis. Basic theory of spectroscopic methods NMR, UV-Vis, IR, and MS will be introduced and spectral interpretation of organic compounds emphasized. To be taken in conjunction with CH 222L. P: CH 221W. 3 credits

CH-222L - Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

Experiments will incorporate spectroscopic analysis (NMR, UV, IR and MS) with synthesis and organic reaction experiments such as oxidation-reduction, esterification, saponification, and nucleophilic substitution reactions. To be taken in conjunction with CH 222. P: CH 221, CH 221L. 3 hours. 1 credit

CH-241 - Introduction to Analytical Chemistry I

This course includes the analysis of data in analytical chemistry, basic statistics, stoichiometry, titrations, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases and buffers, gravimetry, complexometry, redox, and principles of spectrophotometry. Some experiments may be mini-projects. To be taken in conjunction with CH 241L. P: CH 222, CH 222L. 3 credits

CH-241L - Introduction to Analytical Chemistry I Laboratory

Laboratory experiments will incorporate lecture material emphasizing data collection (and statistical analysis)and analytical techniques including titrations, gravimetry and spectrophotometry. To be taken in conjunction with CH 241. Some experiments may be mini-projects. P: CH 222, 222L. 3 hours. 1 credit

CH-242 - Introduction to Analytical Chemistry II

Introduction to theory and use of modern chemical instrumentation techniques including titrations (acid-base, complexometric), spectroscopy (UV, IR, AAS), electrochemistry, chromatography (GC, HPLC), and other techniques. To be taken in conjunction with CH 242L. Some experiments may be mini-projects. P: CH 222, CH 222L, CH 241, CH 241L. 3 credits

CH-242L - Introduction to Analytical Chemistry II Laboratory

Laboratory experiments will incorporate lecture material including titrations, spectrophotometry, electrochemistry and chromatography. To be taken in conjunction with CH 242. P: CH 222, CH 222L, CH 241, CH 241L. 3 hours. 1 credit

CH-321 - Physical Chemistry I

A study of the theoretical principles underlying the areas of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, chemical equilibrium, and properties of gases. To be taken in conjunction with CH 321L. Some experiments may be mini-projects. P: CH 241, CH 241L, CH 242, CH 242L, MA 122. SC 131, SC 132 are strongly recommended. 3 credits

CH-321L - Physical Chemistry I Laboratory

Laboratory experiments will incorporate lecture material relating to equilibrium, gas laws, acid-base chemistry, thermochemistry and kinetics. To be taken in conjunction with CH 321. P: CH 241, CH 241L, CH 242, CH 242L, MA 122. SC 131, SC 132 are strongly recommended. 1 credit

CH-322 - Physical Chemistry II

A study of the theoretical principles underlying the areas of phase equilibria, properties of mixtures, electrochemistry, kinetics, quantum chemistry, basic spectroscopy, macroscopic and microscopic structures. To be taken in conjunction with CH 322L. Some experiments may be mini-projects. P: CH 321, CH 321L, MA 122. SC 131, SC 132 are strongly recommended. 3 credits

CH-322L - Physical Chemistry II Laboratory

Laboratory experiments will incorporate lecture material relating to viscosity, equilibrium, kinetics, and electrochemistry. To be taken in conjunction with CH 322. P: CH 321, CH 321L. 1 credit

CH-324 - Biochemistry

Study of the structure and function of complex macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and carbohydrates. Intermolecular interactions and regulatory mechanisms that control these interactions will be examined. Cellular metabolism and a quantitative analysis of certain biochemical reactions will also be covered. To be taken in conjunction with CH 324L. P: BI 111, BI 112, CH 221, CH 222. BI 216 is strongly recommended. 3 credits

CH-324L - Biochemistry Laboratory

Experimental techniques are aimed at extracting and quantitating proteins from cells. Purified macromolecules are analyzed using a combination of chromatographic, electrophoretic, and immunobiological methods. Students gain proficiency in operating equipment and instruments commonly found in a biochemical laboratory. The course may also include visits to off-campus sites engaged in advanced and highly specialized biochemical experimentation. To be taken in conjunction with CH 324. P: BI 111, BI 112, CH 221, CH 222. BI 216 is strongly recommended. 1 credit

College Course (CC)

CC-101 - Preparation for College Study

This course is recommended for any Accelerated Degree Program student who has not taken a college level course or any student who would like to enhance their skills in the areas of self-management, learning techniques, time management, using eLearning and MyAlbertus. An emphasis will be placed on methods for managing the unique challenges experienced by adult learners. 3 credits

CC-113 - Transfer Professional Development Seminar

All traditional undergraduate students are required to develop an ePortfolio aligned with the benchmarks in core skills of the College's general education Insight Program. In this course, the transfer student will create an ePortfolio to demonstrate learning over time, reflect on personal strengths and weaknesses, practice responsible use of digital technologies, and prepare for meaningful careers. Required for all transfer students in their initial semester. 1 credit

CC-201 - Study Abroad

CC-213 - Professional Development Seminar

A course designed to support students in the midpoint of their academic experience through continued development of their general education ePortfolio in Handshake, as well as career exploration and preparation. Through selection and reflection upon academic and co-curricular work, students will identify personal strengths and weaknesses, practice responsible use of digital technologies, and prepare for meaningful careers. Required for all traditional undergraduate students with sophomore standing. 1 credit

CC-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied. 1.5-3 credits

CC-260 - Career, Internship and Job Strategies

This course introduces students to career development, internship, and the job search process. Students identify their short and long-term career goals through a comprehensive process of self-evaluation. Students gain a realistic assessment of their skills, values, interests, and life experiences and learn how to apply this information when making career decisions. Students develop skills related to career research, resume development, social media marketing, letter writing, networking, interviewing, and job/internship/graduate school search methods. Students will also create a professional page in their ePortfolio related to their career development. This one-credit course is required of juniors in the general education program and must be taken as a prerequisite to participating in an internship or practicum. Open to traditional undergraduate juniors and seniors only. 1 credit

Communications (CO)

CO-117 - Introduction to Theatre

The introduction to the study of theatre develops the student's appreciation of and response to the theatrical event and the collaboration efforts essential to producing a quality experience General Education: A. 3 credits

CO-121 - Introduction to Mass Communication

Survey of basic content and structural elements of mass media and their functions and influences on society. Examines social, economic, political, and cultural changes from the perspective of mass communication theory and practice. General Education: A. 3 credits

CO-125 - Podcast Writing & Development

This course introduces students to the digital audio production process. The course will provide students the opportunity to plan, script, and produce short audio programs. Topics include: surveying the proper equipment for the production, arranging recording sessions, techniques for mixing, and editing sessions. 3 credits

CO-139 - Introduction to Digital Video & Audio

This course focuses on concepts and techniques associated with digital video production with a focus on internet distribution. Topics include introductory video production and post-production principles, introductory animation principles, documentary best-practices, pre-production planning, and both on-location and studio production. Through a combination of planned location shoots, group projects, and individual creative production students will be exposed to principles and practices associated with both field and studio production. General Education: A. 3 credits

CO-141 - Public Speaking

A skills-based course focusing on the theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on content, audience analysis, organization, language, delivery, critical evaluation of messages and listening skills. Emphasis is on student performance emphasizing original thinking, effective organization and direct communication of ideas. General Education: A. 3 credits

CO-161 - Human Communication

A study of communication principles and processes as they relate to interpersonal communication, intrapersonal communication, small group and team communication, culture and communication, communication in organizations, and mediated communication. Students engage in practical and ethical application of concepts to their professional and personal lives. General Education: A. 3 credits

CO-210 - Creative Copywriting

This course will study core strategies for the commercial application of creative writing. Students will develop original copywriting skills, study their implementation, and analyze their effectiveness. 3 credits

CO-219 - Research Methods

This course is a "hands on" approach to research in which the student will learn to design and carry out field observations, experiments, content analyses, or surveys. 3 credits

CO-220 - Sociology of Communications

This course focuses on mass media representations of gender, race, class, and culture. Students will critically engage all forms of mass media from the traditional to new technologies to examine the effect media has on their lives, ways in which opinions are formed and how culture is shaped. 3 credits

CO-220W - Sociology of Communications

This course focuses on mass media representations of gender, race, class, and culture. Students will critically engage all forms of mass media from the traditional to new technologies to examine the effect media has on their lives, ways in which opinions are formed and how culture is shaped. 3 credits

CO-229 - Introduction to Digital Communications

This course will provide students with a detailed critical introduction to the field of digital communications. Topics will include practical applications of digital communication across disciplines: communications studies, journalism, public relations, advertising, media and cinema studies, and communication technology. The class will offer students a glimpse of these disciplines and allow them to integrate them all together. Additionally, this course will provide an entry point for students who have had little experience with either digital technology or communication courses. 3 credits

CO-230 - Internet Marketing and Advertising

Internet marketing and promotional communications are increasing at dramatic rates. Both large and small businesses and individual entrepreneurs cannot hope to survive in the 21st Century without strong Internet marketing and advertising plans. This course will introduce the student to the basics of product/service promotion as practiced using the medium of the World Wide Web. Specifically, topics to be explored include: What is "e-business"?, Internet User Characteristics and Behavior, Online Market Research, Product and Pricing on the Net, The Net as Distribution Channel, The Internet Marketing Plan, and Advertisement Design for the Web. 3 credits

CO-239 - Digital Video & Audio I

A continuation of AR/CO 139, this course provides support for students to develop and complete an intermediate project using digital video and audio tools. Students will carry individual projects through pre-production, production, post-production and distribution. Students will further be required to assist with the productions of their peers. P: AR 139 or CO 139. 3 credits

CO-242 - Electronic Field Production

This course focuses on concepts and techniques associated with Electronic Field Production (EFP). Topics include Electronic News Gathering (ENG), sports coverage, commercials, music videos, and on-location dramatic productions. In ENG work the primary goal is to get the story, however conditions are not always ideal. Special attention will be given to contingency planning and preparation for unforeseen circumstances. Through a combination of planned location shoots and group projects, students will be exposed to principles and practices associated with all aspects of field production. 3 credits

CO-243 - Motion Graphics & Visual Effects I

This course builds on the post-production skills introduced in AR/CO 139 developing motion graphics and compositing visual effects for digital, time-based productions. Students will study the history of visual effects and motion graphics technology, contemporary and historic time-based works, and develop original animated content. P: AR 139 or CO 239. 3 credits

CO-244 - Motion Graphics & Visual Effects II

This course builds on the post-production skills introduced in AR/CO 243 and allows for students to develop advanced works of digital animation. If offered simultaneously with Digital Video I or II, this course may further support the significant development of motion graphics or visual effects for peers' productions in those courses. P: AR 243 or CO 243. 3 credits

CO-254 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Communications frame of reference. 3 credits

CO-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Communications frame of reference. 3 credits

CO-255W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Communications frame of reference. 3 credits

CO-260 - Advertising Techniques

In this course, we introduce the student to the workings of modern advertising. Focusing upon the creative process in American advertising, students will submit originally conceived and prepared advertisements or advertising copy as weekly assignments. In addition, students will explore market research and media buying as allied topics. No prior skills are required, but enthusiasm and imagination are welcome prerequisites. This course is highly recommended for those wishing to pursue a career in advertising, marketing, public relations, and/or promotional communications. 3 credits

CO-261 - Public Relations

This course focuses upon the informational and promotional roles that public relations plays in commercial and non-profit sectors. In addition to developing a student's writing skills, we will address employee communication, community relations, media relations, government relations, and social responsibility. Problem solving and PR expressive skills are emphasized. Highly recommended for those students interested in corporate communications. 3 credits

CO-263 - Social Media Storytelling

How do you tell a story in 280 characters or a series of pictures? This course will teach storyboarding for social media platforms, how to use text, pictures, and hashtags to create a story on social media. 3 credits

CO-267 - Social Media Journalism

This course explicitly studies journalistic practice in a social media environment. Students will study contemporaneous new media works of journalism while developing, writing, disseminating and analyzing their own original factual content. 3 credits

CO-301 - Organizational Communications

Bureaucracies and large-sized organizational structures abound in modern America. Frankly, there is no escaping this reality. Organizational Communications takes historical, structural and ethical perspectives in examining the nature and role of communications within the organizational framework. Direct attention will be given to applying these perspectives to the phenomenon of the modern sports industries, but comparative and contrasting attention will be given to large, midsize, and small businesses; and to those organizations that exist in the not-for-profit sector. Although part of the Sports Communications Sequence, Organizational Communications is highly recommended for all students interested in better understanding and affecting the dynamics involved in effective communications within any organizational framework. General Education: C. 3 credits

CO-301W - Organizational Communications

Bureaucracies and large-sized organizational structures abound in modern America. Frankly, there is no escaping this reality. Organizational Communications takes historical, structural and ethical perspectives in examining the nature and role of communications within the organizational framework. Direct attention will be given to applying these perspectives to the phenomenon of the modern sports industries, but comparative and contrasting attention will be given to large, midsize, and small businesses; and to those organizations that exist in the not-for-profit sector. Although part of the Sports Communications Sequence, Organizational Communications is highly recommended for all students interested in better understanding and affecting the dynamics involved in effective communications within any organizational framework. General Education: C. 3 credits

CO-326 - The Creative Mind

What marks and makes a creative mind? What is the difference between talent and creativity? Have you explored your potential as a creative person? Can we solve contemporary problems without developing our creative self? These are some of the questions explored as we develop knowledge of our creative mind. General Education: C. 3 credits

CO-339 - Digital Video & Audio II

A continuation of AR/CO 239, this course provides support for students to develop and complete an advanced project using digital video and/or audio tools. Students will carry individual projects through pre-production, production, post-production and distribution. Students will further be required to assist with the productions of their peers. P: AR 239 or CO 239. 3 credits

CO-341 - Film Appreciation

As an introduction to the study of cinema, this course focuses upon the theories, principles, and expressive skills associated with film analysis. Through the examination of selected early film classics, major motion picture narratives, and film shorts, the student will learn to apply classical, auteur, and genre approaches to film criticism. The student is expected to view movies outside of class meetings and to write several, short analytical reviews. The emphasis is upon "film literacy" and the ability to "read" a motion picture. General Education: C. 3 credits

CO-351 - Special Topics in Cinema Studies

This course highlights a specific collection of cinema production and criticism as chosen by the instructor. This course will rotate its focus and may be taken for credit up to three times with specific approval from the instructor to ensure an identical focus is not repeated. This course will feature regular cinematic screenings, review of scholarly criticism, and original analysis. Students are not expected to have any prior film analysis background. General Education: C. 3 credits

CO-362 - Persuasion

In this interactive course, students will learn the key theories, concepts, and strategies that define persuasive communication. Students will start from the basic theories of audience analysis and measuring attitudes and use them to craft and evaluate persuasive messages, especially for social media. Students will also get the opportunity to apply course concepts, utilize persuasive skills, and expand their professional portfolios by participating in a community-based campaign and experiential-learning project. General Education: C. 3 credits

CO-365 - Writing for Interactive Media

Despite the changing media landscape, good writing skills are a necessity for professional communication. Students in this class use written modalities to create, develop, and hone a distinct, searchable written voice within varied media environments. Much of professional media work involves creating a consistent voice or presence for a person, organization, or company. In this course, participants focus on how to accomplish (or enhance) this process using effective compositional techniques. 3 credits

CO-371 - Political Communication in the 21st Century

In the 21st century, a new political system is taking shape in the United States shaped profoundly by the interactive telecommunications revolution. America is increasingly turning into an electronic republic and this is transforming our views of democracy and the way we interact with government. Armed with modern technical devices, we have all become instant journalists ready to report and document on any newsworthy event. With the advent of the Internet, web blogging, and "instant" news, communications has been substantially redefined. This course will explore both the opportunities and the dangers ahead for political communications in the electronic information age. 3 credits

CO-372 - Political Activism on Social Media

This course will introduce students to the movements born and continued on social media. The course will help students understand and reflect beyond "like/share" mode of activism and push them into creating actionable and behavioral changes via multimedia campaigns on social media. 3 credits

CO-380 - Internship

Communications internships offer the opportunity for students to be placed at professional, media related sites in either the profit or not-for-profit sectors. These on-the-job experiences allow students to gain "real world" experience and skills while earning college credit. Internships require that the student complete 40 hours of site service for every credit received for the experience. 1-12 credits

CO-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-3 credits

CO-391 - Communications Capstone

In the Communications Capstone students develop a specialized project and portfolio focused on learning from their Communications courses in a comprehensive manner. The National Communication Association (NCA) standards of communication competence provide the grounding for the course. As part of the course, students are asked to demonstrate mastery or excellence in following NCA communication competencies: (1) communication theory and practice (ability to explain, synthesize, apply, and critique theories and concepts), (2) communication inquiry (ability to apply appropriate analytical tools to answer a question or solve a problem), (3) audience adaptation (ability to adapt messages, oral and written, to the diverse needs of an audience), and (4) critical thinking (ability to listen to messages actively, evaluate messages thoughtfully, and respond to messages mindfully). P: Senior status. 3 credits

CO-394 - Social Media Capstone

The capstone project will have the student culminate the coursework they have completed in the major. They will run a real-time project based on the theories they have learned and test their skills on social media platforms. 3 credits

Computer Information Systems (CIS)

CIS-110 - Contemporary Issues in Computer Information Systems

This course will introduce students to a range of current issues experienced by technology and information systems leaders in a variety of industry sectors. By taking advantage of guest speakers and research into emerging technology challenges, students will gain an appreciation of the scope of the technology industry and the potential opportunities they will encounter through the CIS program and in their future careers. This course will offer potential CIS majors an introduction to the field and offer existing CIS students a broad perspective on the ways in which technology affects businesses. 3 credits

CIS-115 - Computer Essentials

A general description of the use of computers in business and an introduction to solving practical business problems using the microcomputer. Topics include basic computer architecture, input/output devices, and storage devices. Microcomputer topics concentrate on five areas: word processing, spreadsheets, databases, graphics, and communications. Microsoft Office is used. This course is designed for those who feel they need an introductory computer course. 3 credits

CIS-131 - Programming for Everyone I

This course, built in collaboration with Google, provides a gentle, but thorough, introduction to programming using Python. You will learn the core concepts and techniques needed to create programs and perform basic data analysis. By the end of this course, you'll be ready to pursue further study in computer science and unlock more advanced programming courses. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

CIS-132 - Programming for Everyone II

This course, built in collaboration with Google, follows on from Programming for Everyone I. In the first half of the course, you will learn how to leverage your Python skills to treat the internet as a source of data. The second half of the course will teach you the fundamentals of Structured Query Language (SQL) and database design. By the end of the course, you will improve your programming skills and learn how to build a range of applications. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: CIS 131. 3 credits

CIS-170 - Operating System Concepts

An introduction to computer operating systems, this course teaches techniques for setting up files and directories, backing up files, and organizing programs on a microcomputer. The course teaches practical instruction in Windows. 3 credits

CIS-171 - Business Spreadsheet Development

A detailed description of the use, design, and development of complex spreadsheets to solve business problems. Topics include graphing, macro development, and other advanced spreadsheet features and techniques. Principles of good spreadsheet design are emphasized throughout the course. Special emphasis will be placed on accounting software applications. Microsoft Excel is one of the packages used in this course. 3 credits

CIS-172 - Database Development

A detailed description of the use of databases in business and practical instruction in the development of databases on the microcomputer. Topics include table creation, sorting, indexing, and reporting. Students develop an understanding of the uses of databases in business and the management of a database on a microcomputer. Microsoft Access is used. 3 credits

CIS-174 - Introduction to Programming

An introduction to computer programming. This course concentrates on developing good techniques for planning, developing, and maintaining computer programs. These include: the development of algorithms, structures coding techniques, and testing techniques. The course includes practical instruction in writing programs on the microcomputer using Visual Basic. 3 credits

CIS-210 - Data Privacy and Digital Security

This course will explore a variety of topics relating to online privacy, digital safety, digital citizenship, and the protection of personal information in the increasingly digital world. Students will engage with topics such as data brokering, facial recognition technology, personally identifiable information, government regulation, industry oversight, and the responsibility of organizations and individuals to act in an ethical manner across a range of disciplines and contexts. General Education: C. 3 credits

CIS-221 - Security Auditing and Risk Assessment

This course covers the foundational methods of security auditing and presents the key elements of security risk assessment for organizations. Students will get a practical view of the primary risk assessment methods and exposure to tools commonly used in the process of conducting security audits. Topics to be covered will include risk mapping, security risk remediation and ongoing audit methods to ensure the integrity of organizational data. 3 credits

CIS-231 - Legal Issues in Cybersecurity

This course will focus on practical and legal issues affecting organizational leadership within the IT sector. The topics covered in this class will include compliance with federal and industry-specific protocols, protecting the rights of stakeholders, employee oversight and privacy laws, establishment of business policies, and analysis of the changing legal frameworks for Cybersecurity professionals. General Education: C. 3 credits

CIS-231W - Legal Issues in Cybersecurity

This course will focus on practical and legal issues affecting organizational leadership within the IT sector. The topics covered in this class will include compliance with federal and industry-specific protocols, protecting the rights of stakeholders, employee oversight and privacy laws, establishment of business policies, and analysis of the changing legal frameworks for Cybersecurity professionals. General Education: C. 3 credits

CIS-252 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Computer Information Systems frame of reference. 3 credits

CIS-276 - Systems Analysis and Design

An introduction to analyzing and designing computer systems for business. Topics include cost benefit analysis, input/output design, file design, data flow diagramming, and project management. Students will learn to work effectively as a member of a project team designing a complex computer system. 3 credits

CIS-279 - Management of the Information Systems Function

In this course, students study the principles of managing an information systems service function in business. Topics include: objectives, organization, client relations, cost allocation, computer center operations, legal issues, and the application development process. P: CIS 115. 3 credits

CIS-282 - Computer Networks

A study of the hardware and software used in local area networks. Includes study of the use and maintenance of network operations systems. 3 credits

CIS-286 - Internet and Web Publishing

This course covers the basics of web design, including search engine optimization, website layout, navigation, calls to action and other essentials of effective design for the World Wide Web. Students create their own websites with multiple related pages, links to other sites, and complex graphics and photographs. 3 credits

CIS-301 - Technology and the Arts

This course includes all forms of creative expression, and their evolution through digital technology. It demonstrates the connection between the arts, humanities, and technology that continue to influence today's digital society. General Education: C. 3 credits

CIS-301W - Technology and the Arts

This course includes all forms of creative expression, and their evolution through digital technology. It demonstrates the connection between the arts, humanities, and technology that continue to influence today's digital society. General Education: C. 3 credits

CIS-315 - Healthcare and Information Systems

Information technology is transforming the delivery, management, and economics of healthcare. This course will explore the technologies that support healthcare information systems, such as software applications; system analysis and design; data management; networks and data communication; and system standards and security. Particular attention will be paid to the benefits and challenges of information technologies in medical record keeping; remote diagnosis and treatment; and improving efficiency and quality of care. 3 credits

CIS-320 - Computer Forensics I

This course is designed as an introduction to computer forensics. It will cover the basic concepts of cybercrime and information systems forensics, and provide a solid foundation for more advanced computer forensic concepts. It will include the processes involved in searching hardware, computer programs and data for evidence. 3 credits

CIS-321 - Computer Forensics II

This continuation course will introduce students to advanced information systems forensics techniques. It will include the processes involved in searching hardware, computer programs, and data for evidence. P: CIS 320. 3 credits

CIS-325 - Data Communications

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the technologies and products related to communications systems. It will include management issues related to network planning, implementation, and administration. Among the topics covered are: distributed data processing, communication techniques, network design, and security. 3 credits

CIS-330 - Issues in Computer Ethics

An introduction to ethical decision-making as it relates to computer technology. This course includes the investigation of Internet-related and on-the-job issues. Items addressed include privacy and freedom of speech issues, intellectual property rights, the creation and maintenance of computer databases, and computer-related criminal activities. General Education: C. 3 credits

CIS-330W - Issues in Computer Ethics

An introduction to ethical decision-making as it relates to computer technology. This course includes the investigation of Internet-related and on-the-job issues. Items addressed include privacy and freedom of speech issues, intellectual property rights, the creation and maintenance of computer databases, and computer-related criminal activities. General Education: C. 3 credits

CIS-331 - Incident Management and Response

This course addresses the methods by which an IT professional can manage cybersecurity incidents and follow up procedures to be conducted immediately after an event. Topics to be covered include analysis of the extent of the infiltration, incident containment, root cause analysis, evaluation of the scope of the data breach, and strategies to engage in constructive dialogue with stakeholders. 3 credits

CIS-340 - Application Development I: Exploring Web Applications

Modern development relies on frameworks which provide developers with powerful tools to speed up development. If you want to build apps, you need to understand how to use frameworks. This course, which has been built in collaboration with Google, will introduce you to Django - a framework used for data-driven web applications. You'll learn the fundamentals of Django, improve your database management skills, and begin developing your own apps. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: CIS 131. CIS 132 is strongly recommended. 3 credits

CIS-341 - Application Development II: Building Web Applications

This course - built in collaboration with Google - is the second part of the application development series. In this course, you will put your skills into practice and build your own application. By the end of this course, you'll have a greater understanding of the technologies that power modern apps and be able to build your own. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: CIS 131, CIS 132, CIS 340. 3 credits

CIS-346 - User Experience I: Understanding User Experience

Technology companies spend billions of dollars ensuring that their products are intuitive and delight users. This course will teach you how they do that. You'll learn what drives product usability, the basics of User Experience (UX) design and research, and how to build wireframes and prototypes. By the end of this course, you'll be on your way to building experiences that make customers happy. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

CIS-347 - User Experience II: Building Compelling User Experiences

This course builds upon User Experience I and teaches students how to build effective user experiences through a rigorous process of implementing best practices, testing designs and iterating. This course will also cover topics such as branding, color palettes, user journeys, and designing for multiple platforms. To successfully complete this course, students will need to build a mobile app or website prototype and iterate upon it based on user feedback. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: CIS 346. 3 credits

CIS-380 - Internship

This is a field-based course in which students gain on-site employment experience in a local business establishment for 120 contact hours per 3 credits. The student is responsible for maintaining an integrative journal and completing other academic requirements. A student may repeat this course only once, and the second internship must be in a different place of employment. P: 12 credits in the Business Administration, Management, and Sport Management Department plus junior or senior standing. 3-12 credits

CIS-385 - Information Systems Security

A study of security policies, models, and mechanisms for secrecy, integrity, and availability. Topics include operating system models and mechanisms for mandatory and discretionary controls; data models, concepts, and mechanisms for database security; basic cryptography and its applications; security in computer networks and distributed systems; and control and prevention of viruses. Concentration will be placed on the related legal issues. 3 credits

CIS-388 - Introduction to Project Management

This course covers principles, practices, and techniques for the management of business and technology projects. Topics include: project planning, scheduling, performing cost estimates, risk analysis, implementation and control, and project termination. This course introduces a variety of project management software packages. 3 credits

CIS-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

CIS-393 - Senior Computer Project

The graduating senior undertakes a major research project in the field of CIS, which includes on-site inquiry and the writing of a senior thesis on the basis of research. P: Senior standing. 3 credits

Criminal Justice (CJ)

CJ-111 - Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

Students will review the origins and foundations of our American system of policing, the relationship between the individual citizen and the state/federal governments' police powers. Included in this section of the course will be an overview of the Fourth Amendment, the Fifth Amendment, and the Sixth Amendment. Students will also review the judicial system, and become familiar with the procedures followed in a criminal trial. Finally, the students will examine sentencing issues and the sanctions available against a criminal convict, including incarceration in jail or prison, probation, and parole. General Education: B. 3 credits

CJ-121 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course focuses on how social institutions and social organization generate problems for people and for society. Particular attention will be paid to political and economic inequalities, health and illness, education, the environment, and the criminal justice system. General Education: C. 3 credits

CJ-121W - Contemporary Social Problems

This course focuses on how social institutions and social organization generate problems for people and for society. Particular attention will be paid to political and economic inequalities, health and illness, education, the environment, and the criminal justice system. General Education: C. 3 credits

CJ-231 - Deviance and Criminology

An examination of the social construction of the categories of "crime" and "deviance" with a focus on data and theories used in Sociology and Criminal Justice Studies. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

CJ-232 - Juvenile Delinquency

Investigation of delinquency as a social category, including theories of construction and causation, patterns of delinquency, and the working of the juvenile justice system. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

CJ-233 - Corrections

Examination of philosophy, theory, and practice of criminal punishment and of the processes which characterize arrest, prosecution, trial, and sentencing. Formal and informal operation of law enforcement agencies are studied, with special attention to patterns of differential treatment accorded different social and economic groups. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

CJ-234 - Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice

This course is designed to challenge students' ability to discern the complexities of some of the fundamental issues faced by criminal justice professionals today, including the consequences of our nation's "war" on drugs; the possible consequences of the legalization of drugs; gun control; the insanity defense; the development of the victim's rights movement; predicting juvenile delinquency; and probation and parole. P: CJ 111. 3 credits

CJ-238 - Criminal Evidence

This course is designed to introduce students to the rules of evidence which govern the conduct of criminal trials. Starting out with an explanation of direct and circumstantial evidence, students will then examine the hearsay rule and its many exception, privileges, and the standards which govern expert and lay testimony. Finally, students will finish the course with an examination of how the courtroom rules affect police officers in the field as they investigate criminal behavior. P: CJ 111. 3 credits

CJ-239 - National Security & Civil Liberty

In this course, students will explore the complex problems faced by our nation as we attempt to balance the conflicting need to maintain our national security with the need to ensure individual civil liberty. Topics covered include: subjecting civilians to military justice, martial law declaration, suspending habeas corpus, designating persons as unlawful combatants, and law enforcement scrutiny of lawful political protest. In addition, students will review how the events taking place during various time periods in our history, such as the Civil War, the Cold War era, and the 1960s shaped our government's policies toward balancing security needs with the guarantee of civil liberties we enjoy. 3 credits

CJ-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Criminal Justice frame of reference. 3 credits

CJ-280 - Criminal Justice Practicum

Fieldwork experience with approval of Program Director. P: CJ 111 plus 15 hours in Criminal Justice. 3 credits

CJ-310 - Sociology of Law and Social Control

This course explores the social processes of law and social control in the social context of the United States. Discusses major theories of law and considers the role of law as both a cause and effect of social change. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

CJ-345 - Criminal Law and Procedure

This course is designed to introduce students to the development of substantive and procedural due process, focusing on the ancient roots of criminal law from Medieval England up to the present day. Various topics such as criminal responsibility, causation, attempts, crimes and criminal procedure will be analyzed. P: CJ 111. 3 credits

CJ-380 - Internship

Fieldwork experience approved by the Program Director. P: Junior or senior status. 3 credits

CJ-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

CJ-391 - Senior Seminar: Ethics

In this seminar-based course, students in Criminal Justice will study the difficult ethical issues faced by criminal justice practitioners on a daily basis and how the ethical challenges faced by police, prosecutors, judges, and corrections officers can be effectively addressed. 3 credits

Digital Media Studies (DM)

DM-380 - Internship

Digital Media Studies internships offer the opportunity for students to be placed at professional, media related sites in either the profit or not-for-profit sectors. These on-the-job experiences allow students to gain "real world" experience and skills while earning college credit. Internships require that the student complete 40 hours of site service for every credit received for the experience. 1-12 credits

DM-391 - Digital Media Studies Capstone

This course serves as the capstone course for the major in Digital Media Studies. It will provide an environment where the student can identify and critique threads of learning from previous Media Studies coursework. It will give students the opportunity to assess their proficiency in the literacies associated in the program: oral, promotional, management, computer, written, and media. The course culminates in the production and formal showing of a multimedia project to be designed in consultation with the faculty member. 3 credits

Drama (DR)

DR-244A - Creative Writing: Poetry, Short Fiction, Short Theater Pieces

This course invites students with a serious interest in writing to compose various forms of poetry, short fiction, and/or theater pieces. Through weekly writing and class workshops, this course helps students discover material, find and develop an authentic voice, and experiment with different kinds of writing. 3 credits

DR-244B - Creative Writing: Poetry, Short Fiction, Short Theater Pieces

This course invites students with a serious interest in writing to compose various forms of poetry, short fiction, and/or theater pieces. Through weekly writing and class workshops, this course helps students discover material, find and develop an authentic voice, and experiment with different kinds of writing. 3 credits

DR-245A - The Composing Process

Making use of class exercises, workshops, and individual conferences, this course will guide students to discovering materials, affecting audiences, and writing creatively with clarity and power. 3 credits

DR-245B - The Composing Process

Making use of class exercises, workshops, and individual conferences, this course will guide students to discovering materials, affecting audiences, and writing creatively with clarity and power. 3 credits

DR-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Drama frame of reference. 3 credits

DR-255W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a drama frame of reference. 3 credits

DR-283 - Shakespeare I

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on the turbulent history plays (Richard II, Henry IV Part I and Part II, Henry V); sparkling romantic comedies (A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It); and two of the most popular and poignant tragedies (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet). 3 credits

DR-283W - Shakespeare I

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on the turbulent history plays (Richard II, Henry IV Part I and Part II, Henry V); sparkling romantic comedies (A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It); and two of the most popular and poignant tragedies (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet). 3 credits

DR-284 - Shakespeare II

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on three great tragedies (Macbeth, Othello, King Lear); two mind-bending, problematic plays (Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure); and the fascinating and beautiful final plays (The Winter's Tale, The Tempest). 3 credits

DR-284W - Shakespeare II

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on three great tragedies (Macbeth, Othello, King Lear); two mind-bending, problematic plays (Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure); and the fascinating and beautiful final plays (The Winter's Tale, The Tempest). 3 credits

DR-293 - From Adultery to Apocalypse: Five Amazing Plays

This course focuses on such crucial issues as Heroism; Love in a Violent World: War and Anti-Capitalism; Apocalypse. We explore plays of different countries, cultures, centuries, and languages. We develop the skills to understand, inhabit, and carefully analyze selected plays both as literary texts and as theatrical events. This course offers students an opportunity to engage in creative and critical dialogue with the plays, their characters, and their authors as well as with each other, and to articulate that experience both orally and in writing. General Education: B. 3 credits.

DR-326 - The Creative Mind

What marks and makes a creative mind? What is the difference between talent and creativity? Have you explored your potential as a creative person? Can we solve contemporary problems without developing our creative self? These are some of the questions explored as we develop knowledge of our creative mind. General Education: C. 3 credits

DR-383 - Murder to Miracle-Four Shakespeare Plays

This course is designed to offer an opportunity to read and compare four selected plays with the themes of murder and miracle. It is open to students in any major and at any level. No prior experience in reading plays is required. 3 credits

DR-383W - Murder to Miracle-Four Shakespeare Plays

This course is designed to offer an opportunity to read and compare four selected plays with the themes of murder and miracle. It is open to students in any major and at any level. No prior experience in reading plays is required. 3 credits

DR-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

Education (ED)

ED-170 - Health Education for Teachers

This course familiarizes students with the topics of nutrition, first aid, disease, community health, mental health, youth suicide, child abuse, and alcohol and drug abuse, as well as other health considerations, as they may impact school success. The course includes discussion and practice of methods for instructing young people about these health-related topics. 2 credits

ED-190 - Orientation to the Schools

A weekly seminar including an overview of major events and court decisions that have affected public schools during the nation's history, and a consideration of social, political, and legal issues on individual schools and school districts, as well as various challenges teachers experience as part of their daily routine. Students are expected to write brief weekly papers and keep reflective journals, as well as to participate in electronic discussion forums. Attention is given to the process of developing a professional Teaching Portfolio. This course includes a field experience requirement consisting of forty hours spent in a school environment under the supervision of a site supervisor. 2 credits

ED-212 - History and Philosophy of Education

Overview of why and how we educate children. Topics include implicit and explicit goals of education, social reproduction theory, an analysis of selected educational systems in recorded human history, the history of education in the United States, and contemporary educational philosophies. 3 credits

ED-222 - Learning

Whenever experience changes our behavior in a lasting way, learning has taken place. Learning includes acquisition of knowledge, mastery of concepts, cultivation of skills, and development of habits. This course surveys what is known about key forms of learning, emphasizing classical conditioning, operant conditioning, observational learning, verbal learning, and information processing models of memory. Major theories that attempt to explain these processes and how these theories are applied to real world concepts, such as education, will be covered. P: PY 111. 3 credits

ED-227 - Special Education for the Classroom Teacher I

Teacher candidates in the undergraduate teacher preparation program will understand the diverse needs of all students, especially those likely to be enrolled in inclusion classes, and will gain skills to differentiate instruction in all classes. They also will have understanding of CT and Federal legislation pertaining to exceptionalities (such as IDEA, 504 Plans, RtI/SRBI, Pupil Planning and Placement Team process, Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) development, and accommodations/modifications) to ensure their compliance with current regulations and policies. This course requires a 15 hour field experience in a school. 3 credits

ED-228 - Special Education for the Classroom Teacher II

Teacher candidates in the undergraduate teacher preparation program will acquire an understanding of the diverse needs of all students, especially those likely to be enrolled in inclusion classes. They will acquire skills and strategies to meet special needs of students by devising various activities and assignments within the classroom. Specifically, those enrolled in this course will acquire special education knowledge and skills related to instruction in reading comprehension and content-specific literacy needed for success in classes across the curriculum. The course also includes instruction in the detection and recognition of dyslexia, and develops candidates' skills in providing structured literacy interventions for students with dyslexia. Also, as they learn to differentiate instruction, teacher candidates will acquire skill in the use of assistive technology to meet the learning needs of students with a variety of special needs. Additionally, students will become knowledgeable in strategies for addressing social and emotional needs of students in the general classroom. An important component of this course focuses on teacher candidates' reflection on their own cultural competencies, and the strengthening of these competencies in preparation for the diverse population who will be part of the school community in which they will teach. P: ED 227. 1 credit

ED-229 - Psychology of the Exceptional Child

Not all children develop along 'typical' lines. For some, cognitive and/or social-emotional development differs sharply from what is considered normative. This course concerns the psychology of such children, especially insofar as their differences may produce problems in living (e.g., academic failure or social stigmatization). Assessment and diagnostic procedures (e.g., psychological tests) as well as intervention strategies (e.g., behavior modification) will be covered. Specific language and academic skills disorders, autistic-spectrum disorders, mental retardation, selected medical conditions, disruptive behavior disorders, 'internalizing' disorders (e.g., separation anxiety), and the consequences of neglect and abuse will be considered. Some attention also will be paid to the issues raised by giftedness and special talents. In addition to describing the various disorders clinically and phenomenologically, we will try to understand their origins, nature, and developmental implications, and how they can be recognized and effectively addressed in specialized settings (e.g., clinics), in regular classrooms, and in the home. This course includes a fifteen-hour field experience. This course does not fulfill the required special education courses for teacher candidates seeking initial teacher certification in Connecticut. Teacher candidates should consult with the Certification Officer for information about the required special education courses. P: PY 111 and PY 211 or PY 330. 3 credits

ED-242 - Educational Psychology

This course is a study of the assumptions about learning and development that underlie various educational practices by acquainting students with different theories in both of these areas. It provides students with opportunities to develop their problem solving skills in the context of education and psychology. Some of the topics the course covers are development and individual differences, learning theories, problem solving, instructional objectives and methods, motivation, behavior management, and assessment. P: PY 111. 3 credits

ED-251 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within an Education frame of reference. 1-8 credits

ED-320 - Teaching Reading and Writing Across the Curriculum

Emphasis in this course is on the essential importance of including instruction in reading and writing in every class as a means of enabling students to understand and articulate concepts and vocabulary related to content area studies. By becoming familiar with current ILA Standards, as well as with the RTI (SRBI) approach to effective instruction of all students, those enrolled in the course research, observe, and practice techniques and strategies for effective instruction of verbal literacy as an integral part of content instruction at both the middle and high school levels. Effective differentiated instruction, including instruction for English language learners, is an important component of this course. Also, part of the course is a fifteen-hour field experience, spread over the entire semester. This field experience, that takes place at a local school, enables the teacher candidate to assist with classroom reading and writing instruction, and affords familiarization with working with English language learners. 3 credits

ED-321 - Curriculum and Methods of Teaching

This course addresses both curriculum and methods of instruction at both the middle and secondary levels. Attention is given to planning and organization of lessons and study units, effective strategies for classroom teaching, including classroom management techniques, differentiated instruction, and use of appropriate means of assessment. A field experience of at least 20 hours, spread over the entire semester, is a component of this course. Teacher candidates are placed with teachers at the level and in the content area in which they anticipate seeking endorsement. Taken during the same semester as ED 322. 3 credits

ED-322 - Technological Applications in Classroom

This course introduces students to educational technology currently available for classroom use and considers various ways in which teachers employ such technology as effective teaching tools. Student projects and class presentations are central to activities in this course. Taken during the same semester as ED 321. 2 credits

ED-330 - Child Development

An examination of the major theories, issues, and research related to the developing child from conception to puberty, with emphasis on emotional, cognitive, and social development. Current issues, such as the effects of drugs on the fetus, child abuse, and day care centers will be discussed. This course is not required for those who seek initial teacher certification at the middle or secondary level. P: PY 111. 3 credits

ED-341 - Adolescent Psychology

This course examines the development of the individual during the period of transition from childhood to adulthood, including physical changes, personality development, and the influence of family, school, and culture on adolescents. P: PY 111. 3 credits

ED-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

ED-391 - Teaching Practicum

This course consists of a weekly seminar that introduces teacher candidates to edTPA, the student teacher assessment used in Connecticut, and (if arrangements can be made) to the Japanese Lesson Study approach to planning and teaching lessons. In addition, a field experience of at least twenty-four hours spread over the entire semester enables the teacher candidate to prepare for the student teaching experience by observing a highly qualified teacher in a classroom setting at the middle or secondary school level. The teacher candidate will write journals reflecting on the relationship between effective instructional strategies and student learning. As part of the field experience, opportunity is provided for the candidate to engage in limited teaching experiences under the supervision of the classroom teacher. 3 credits

ED-392 - Student Teaching

Concentrated and full-time classroom teaching, under the supervision of a cooperating teacher and a supervisor from the college's Education Programs Department. This experience enables teacher candidates to experience how theory is applied to practice for the purpose of successful teaching and learning. Credit for this course includes participation in weekly seminars on campus during the semester of student teaching. Credit for this course includes participation in weekly seminars on campus during the semester of student teaching. P: ED 391. 9 credits

ED-393 - edTPA Portfolio

At the end of the student teaching experience, student teachers are required to complete an edTPA portfolio. The Connecticut Department of Education requires successful completion of the edTPA portfolio as a culminating summative assessment that is one measure of qualification for initial teacher certification. This performance assessment is designed to evaluate teacher candidates' knowledge and skills in planning, instructing, and assessing student learning. By submission of lesson plans, assessments, and student work, as well as by video recordings and responses to prompts, teacher candidates demonstrate their readiness to teach. This course supports teacher candidates in the aforementioned areas as they move through the edTPA portfolio process. Taken during the same semester as ED 392. This course has a lab fee. 2 credits

English (EN)

EN-100 - Introduction to College English

A basic English course in college-level reading comprehension and expository composition. This course helps prepare students to read, think, and write at the level generally expected in college classes. EN 100 is for students whose preparation is marginal in the skills essential for success in post-secondary education and who may need instruction in the fundamentals of reading and writing Standard English. 4 credits

EN-101 - College Writing

Through the study of the basic strategies of the composing process, students employ written expression as a vehicle of critical thinking as they are trained in the craft of expository writing and coached in skills necessary for producing clear, concise, and coherent essays. 3 credits

EN-102 - Introduction to Literary Genres

The Department's standard introductory survey of literary genres, this course focuses on the comprehension and analysis of fiction, poetry, drama, and the literary essay. Students are required to write at least three expository literary-analytical essays, and they are coached in the articulate and cogent oral explication of literary texts. This course is part of the required core curriculum. P: EN 101 or its equivalent. 3 credits

EN-106W - Written Expression I

Through the study of the basic strategies of the composing process, students employ written expression as a vehicle of critical thinking as they are trained in the craft of expository writing and coached in skills necessary for producing clear, concise, and coherent essays. 3 credits

EN-107W - Written Expression II

Continuing EN 106W, the second semester builds upon students' fundamental knowledge of expository writing and increases proficiency in reading and writing, particularly argument, persuasion, and research. An introduction to the major literary genres provides a context for written response. P: EN 106W. 3 credits

EN-109 - Elements of Effective Writing

This course is designed for the student who needs intensive practice in the techniques of effective writing. Through a focus on the writing process, this course aims to further develop students' abilities to express themselves in persuasion, argument, and some research writing. 3 credits

EN-143A - Introduction to Creative Writing

A writing course designed as a general introduction to the strategies of literary composition. Through sustained and systematic practice in the techniques that stimulate and refine creative writing, students will exercise and develop intuitive and critical abilities essential to significant artistic achievement. 3 credits

EN-143B - Introduction to Creative Writing

A writing course designed as a general introduction to the strategies of literary composition. Through sustained and systematic practice in the techniques that stimulate and refine creative writing, students will exercise and develop intuitive and critical abilities essential to significant artistic achievement. 3 credits

EN-151 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within an English frame of reference. 3 credits

EN-155W - Writing for Humanities: Composing with the Classics

This is a course designed to complement work in Honors: HU 114. Students will refine their understanding of the writing process as they continue to gain a greater appreciation for the relationship between reading texts intelligently and writing with clarity and precision. 1 credit

EN-170 - Foundations of Literary Study

This course introduces students to essential concepts and skills in the discipline of English. Students will develop their skills as readers and writers through the practice of close reading and making literary arguments. They will also learn to work with secondary sources to enrich their understanding of literature in its historical and cultural contexts. 3 credits

EN-210 - Creative Copywriting

This course will study core strategies for the commercial application of creative writing. Students will develop original copywriting skills, study their implementation, and analyze their effectiveness. 3 credits

EN-211 - Post Colonial Literature

This course surveys the emergence of new national literatures in English within the former British Empire. By exploring the question, "what does it mean to be post-colonial?", students will gain a deeper understanding of cultures outside those of America and Britain. Students will discover the work of writers from developing nations and former settler colonies, including India, Nigeria, South Africa, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. 3 credits

EN-220 - The Short Story

A study of the thematic and stylistic range of the short story, with a concentration on the work of several English-language masters of the genre, such as Hawthorne, Poe, James, Crane, Joyce, Hemingway, O'Connor, and Oates. General Education: B. 3 credits

EN-220W - The Short Story

A study of the thematic and stylistic range of the short story, with a concentration on the work of several English-language masters of the genre, such as Hawthorne, Poe, James, Crane, Joyce, Hemingway, O'Connor, and Oates. General Education: B. 3 credits

EN-227 - Masterworks of British Literature I

Introduces students to the treasures of British literature: the tales of Chaucer; sonnets of Shakespeare; poems of Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Marvell, Milton, Dryden, Pope; essays of Swift and Samuel Johnson. Making use of some of the most beautiful and suggestive literary texts in English, this course helps students to become confident and responsive readers of literature. 3 credits

EN-227W - Masterworks of British Literature I

Introduces students to the treasures of British literature: the tales of Chaucer; sonnets of Shakespeare; poems of Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Marvell, Milton, Dryden, Pope; essays of Swift and Samuel Johnson. Making use of some of the most beautiful and suggestive literary texts in English, this course helps students to become confident and responsive readers of literature. 3 credits

EN-228 - Masterworks of British Literature II

The second half of Masterworks of British Literature explores selections from among the prose and poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats; the works of Tennyson, Arnold, the Brownings, Ruskin, Mill, Newman, Carlyle, Pater; and such modern poets as Yeats, Eliot, Auden, and Heaney. 3 credits

EN-234 - Contemporary Fiction

This course will take a dynamic look at literature as it is currently unfolding. We will read a diverse range of short stories and novels from the current century. Who is writing now, on what common themes and in what sorts of styles? The curriculum considers not only the way literature speaks to the current moment, but also its lineage, asking what literary traditions the authors may be perpetuating - or reacting against. 3 credits

EN-236 - British and American Novel of the 20th Century

A comparison of innovative modernist works with more traditional novels of the same era, reflecting the forces which shaped twentieth-century Western culture. Authors considered may include Joseph Conrad, E.M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, and Richard Wright. Also studied are selected works from recent decades. 3 credits

EN-244A - Creative Writing: Poetry, Short Fiction, Short Theater Pieces

This course invites students with a serious interest in writing to compose various forms of poetry, short fiction, and/or theater pieces. Through weekly writing and class workshops, this course helps students discover material, find and develop an authentic voice, and experiment with different kinds of writing. 3 credits

EN-244B - Creative Writing: Poetry, Short Fiction, Short Theater Pieces

This course invites students with a serious interest in writing to compose various forms of poetry, short fiction, and/or theater pieces. Through weekly writing and class workshops, this course helps students discover material, find and develop an authentic voice, and experiment with different kinds of writing. 3 credits

EN-245A - The Composing Process

Making use of class exercises, workshops, and individual conferences, this course will guide students to discovering materials, affecting audiences, and writing creatively with clarity and power. 3 credits

EN-245B - The Composing Process

Making use of class exercises, workshops, and individual conferences, this course will guide students to discovering materials, affecting audiences, and writing creatively with clarity and power. 3 credits

EN-250 - Special Studies in Literature

Topics are interdisciplinary and/or may focus on literature in translation. 3 credits

EN-250W - Special Studies in Literature

Topics are interdisciplinary and/or may focus on literature in translation. 3 credits

EN-251 - Young Adult Literature

This course centers on different kinds of literature read by young adults. It is particularly useful to future teachers. General Education: B. 3 credits

EN-255 - Special Topics in British and American Literature

These courses focus on specific themes, periods, genres, or groups of writers in British and/or American literature. 3 credits

EN-255W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within English frame of reference. 3 credits

EN-261 - Literary Romanticism

This course explores outstanding prose and poetry from selected major Romantic writers such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats from the British literary tradition, and Cooper, Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, and Melville from the American literary tradition. 3 credits

EN-263 - Social Media Storytelling

How do you tell a story in 280 characters or a series of pictures? This course will teach storyboarding for social media platforms, how to use text, pictures, and hashtags to create a story on social media. 3 credits

EN-267 - Social Media Journalism

This course explicitly studies journalistic practice in a social media environment. Students will study contemporaneous new media works of journalism while developing, writing, disseminating and analyzing their own original factual content. 3 credits

EN-268 - Nature and American Literature

This course is an historic and contemporary look at the interplay between wilderness, nature, and civilization in American culture. The course represents a study of how writers imagine and represent nature and wilderness in American literature, and which genres are most effective. Readings are drawn from writers ranging from Henry Thoreau, John Muir, Sarah Orne Jewett, and Willa Cather to Theodore Roethke, Gary Snyder, Stephanie Mills, Barry Lopez, Wendell Berry and Leslie Marmon Silko. The class may also consider artistic themes of nature and wilderness, such as paintings from the Hudson River School and American Impressionism to more contemporary visions of the American landscape. 3 credits

EN-283 - Shakespeare I

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on the turbulent history plays (Richard II, Henry IV Part I and Part II, Henry V); sparkling romantic comedies (A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It); and two of the most popular and poignant tragedies (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet). 3 credits

EN-283W - Shakespeare I

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on the turbulent history plays (Richard II, Henry IV Part I and Part II, Henry V); sparkling romantic comedies (A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It); and two of the most popular and poignant tragedies (Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet). 3 credits

EN-284 - Shakespeare II

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on three great tragedies (Macbeth, Othello, King Lear); two mind-bending, problematic plays (Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure); and the fascinating and beautiful final plays (The Winter's Tale, The Tempest). 3 credits

EN-284W - Shakespeare II

This course explores the literary and theatrical genius of one of the world's greatest and most controversial artists. We will read, discuss, and watch performances (both film and live) of Shakespeare's major plays. This course focuses on three great tragedies (Macbeth, Othello, King Lear); two mind-bending, problematic plays (Antony and Cleopatra, Measure for Measure); and the fascinating and beautiful final plays (The Winter's Tale, The Tempest). 3 credits

EN-293 - From Adultery to Apocalypse: Five Amazing Plays

This course focuses on such crucial issues as Heroism; Love in a Violent World: War and Anti-Capitalism; Apocalypse. We explore plays of different countries, cultures, centuries, and languages. We develop the skills to understand, inhabit, and carefully analyze selected plays both as literary texts and as theatrical events. This course offers students an opportunity to engage in creative and critical dialogue with the plays, their characters, and their authors as well as with each other, and to articulate that experience both orally and in writing. General Education: B. 3 credits.

EN-321 - The Athlete and Sport Across Popular Media and Culture

This course will explore the athlete in sport by examining various representations of sports, the mind/body connection for the athlete, and socio-cultural factors and implications of sports, across a variety of media, including film, television, and the memoir. This inter- and multi- disciplinary course will draw upon literature from media studies, psychology, sociology, and philosophy to examine various narratives and theories of the athlete's journey, and sport in general. We will cover a variety of topics including narratives of greatness, injury, race, gender, ability, class, embodiment, setbacks, and institutions. General Education: C. 3 credits

EN-323 - Youth Activism Across the Americas Through Media and Culture (1920s-Present)

Within Childhood and Youth Studies, young people are often thought of in terms of futurity. Youth activism is one example that challenges this concept. Taking an anti-racist and anti-imperial approach, this course will survey youth activism across North and South America over the past one hundred years. Using multi- and inter- disciplinary approaches, we will explore various media coverage of real youth activists by examining news articles, television broadcasts, books, oral traditional stories, film and television presentations, as well as digital spaces including blogs, tiktok, youtube and other new media sites. We will also address the representation of the youth activist figure in popular culture today, situating them within a cultural-historical context. 3 credits

EN-325 - Cultures of Young People Through Media Texts

This course will draw upon literature from various disciplines including cultural studies, media studies, human geography, sociology and psychology to explore the many narratives of what constitutes childhood and teenagehood in different parts of the world, while problematizing the notion of the universal child's experience. By examining a variety of media texts including movies, TV, novels, children's books, and music, we will describe and analyze how meaning and cultural scripts compare to young people's real experiences in the world. Some topics we will cover include family, friendship, girlhood, boyhood, children's rights, work, play, coming of age, relationships, socio-economic class, race, ability, and religion. By exploring diverse experiences of young people, and by analyzing how they are represented across a variety of genres throughout film history, the course will draw attention to the ideological messages that inform social and cultural understandings of youth and the young person today. 3 credits

EN-337 - Modern Poetry

This course traces the development of modern poetry in Britain and America, with an emphasis on the origin and impact of modernism. Through reading and appreciating modern poetry in all its variety, students will explore what it means to be modern-and perhaps post-modern as well. Poets may include Yeats, Pound, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, Williams, Auden, Moore, Hughes, Bishop, Larkin, Ashbery, and Heaney. 3 credits

EN-343A - Seminar in Poetry Writing

This seminar explores and develops students' interest in different kinds of poetic forms. It includes a final portfolio in the form of a collection of poems or a single long poem. Students can expect to submit their more accomplished work to various literary publications (including Breakwater) and poetry competitions. P: EN 244A/B or permission of instructor. 3 credits

EN-343B - Seminar in Poetry Writing

This seminar explores and develops students' interest in different kinds of poetic forms. It includes a final portfolio in the form of a collection of poems or a single long poem. Students can expect to submit their more accomplished work to various literary publications (including Breakwater) and poetry competitions. P: EN 244A/B or permission of instructor. 3 credits

EN-344A - Seminar in Fiction Writing

An intensive class in composing and evaluating short stories and longer fiction. Students will work on a variety of brief exercises and one major project in narrative composition. P: EN 244A/B or permission of instructor. 3 credits

EN-344B - Seminar in Fiction Writing

An intensive class in composing and evaluating short stories and longer fiction. Students will work on a variety of brief exercises and one major project in narrative composition. P: EN 244A/B or permission of instructor. 3 credits

EN-345A - Seminar in Composing Autobiography

This seminar uses readings, class exercises, and workshop activities to help students begin the process of exploring different versions of writing one's self as a literary text. Issues addressed include becoming the "author" of oneself; autobiography as the "rewriting" of the self; confession and deception as "autobiographical" impulses; the relation between autobiography and fiction. Students compose autobiographical poems or narratives as their final portfolio project. P: EN 143A/B or permission of instructor. 3 credits

EN-345B - Seminar in Composing Autobiography

This seminar uses readings, class exercises, and workshop activities to help students begin the process of exploring different versions of writing one's self as a literary text. Issues addressed include becoming the "author" of oneself; autobiography as the "rewriting" of the self; confession and deception as "autobiographical" impulses; the relation between autobiography and fiction. Students compose autobiographical poems or narratives as their final portfolio project. P: EN 143A/B or permission of instructor. 3 credits

EN-356 - Studies in American Literature

This course will introduce students to major themes in American literature with an emphasis on the diversity of America's literary traditions, including African-American and Indigenous American writing. 3 credits

EN-360 - Literature of Love

This course focuses on the literature of love. As we read selected works from the early Greek poet Sappho to contemporary American poets, we will explore the various meanings love takes on in different cultures, centuries, and contexts-and we will consider the possibility that writing itself can be a way of loving. If you think that love poetry is sentimental or predictable, this seminar will surprise you! General Education: C. 3 credits

EN-360W - Literature of Love

This course focuses on the literature of love. As we read selected works from the early Greek poet Sappho to contemporary American poets, we will explore the various meanings love takes on in different cultures, centuries, and contexts-and we will consider the possibility that writing itself can be a way of loving. If you think that love poetry is sentimental or predictable, this seminar will surprise you! General Education: C. 3 credits

EN-361 - Literature of the Immigrant

Immigration is always two stories: a leaving and an arrival. This course considers the American immigrant experience through the perspective of literature. Novels, short stories, poetry, essays, and memoirs are read to gain understanding of the struggle of creating new lives in an unfamiliar culture. General Education: C. 3 credits

EN-365 - Writing for Interactive Media

Despite the changing media landscape, good writing skills are a necessity for professional communication. Students in this class use written modalities to create, develop, and hone a distinct, searchable written voice within varied media environments. Much of professional media work involves creating a consistent voice or presence for a person, organization, or company. In this course, participants focus on how to accomplish (or enhance) this process using effective compositional techniques. 3 credits

EN-380 - Internship

Field work experience open to senior majors. Requires permission of Department Chair, with whom hours and credits are to be arranged. 3-6 credits

EN-383 - Murder to Miracle-Four Shakespeare Plays

This course is designed to offer an opportunity to read and compare four selected plays with the themes of murder and miracle. It is open to students in any major and at any level. No prior experience in reading plays is required. 3 credits

EN-383W - Murder to Miracle-Four Shakespeare Plays

This course is designed to offer an opportunity to read and compare four selected plays with the themes of murder and miracle. It is open to students in any major and at any level. No prior experience in reading plays is required. 3 credits

EN-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

EN-391 - Senior Seminar in British and American Literature

This is the culminating seminar for English majors which invites in-depth study of selected seminal literary texts. Past seminars have focused on the question: How does reading and knowing poets of the past relate to our reading and knowing of poets of our own time? 3 credits

EN-394 - Senior Seminar in English, Writing, and Media

A capstone class with readings in literature and culture culminating in a final project bringing together the three strands of the program. 3 credits

Global Studies (GL)

GL-111 - Introduction to Global Studies

Globalization refers to the processes which are pulling everyone on the planet together. In Introduction to Global Studies, we will look at politics, history, economics, and ecology to understand both the compression of the world and the rise of consciousness of the globality of human experience. Topics will include terrorism; migration from poor to rich countries; human rights; the flow of jobs and money around the world; human trafficking; transnational smuggling of drugs, weapons, and art; and the impact of human beings on the biosphere. 3 credits

GL-217 - Human Rights and Religious Witness in Latin America: a Film Course

The Americas - North, Central, and South - are the product of European colonial conquest of the Western Hemisphere five hundred years ago. This film course explores the consequences of this colonial origin and examines the cycle of oppression and resistance to oppression in Latin America, more specifically, in Mexico and Central America, from the conquest to the contemporary period. Eight films will dramatize the tragic, beautiful, and epic story of Latin America yesterday and today. Students will report on the films and their relationship to the context of globalizing forces of the Spanish conquest, colonialism, Christianity, trade, American hegemony in the western hemisphere, the Cold War, immigration, and human rights. For each of these globalizing forces, we will employ a twofold approach: (a) identify the actions of the colonial or governmental power and (b) describe the reactions of the Church and of the people. Associated with this approach, we will ask two sets of questions: (a) What justification did the colonial powers use to conquer, dominate, and enslave people? Likewise, in the postcolonial era, what justification did the independent governments use to suppress the people? (b) On the other side of the conflicts, what motivated the champions of human rights, who rose up in every age of this history to defend the indigenous peoples and the peasants? Their examples will lead us to a consideration of Liberation Theology. One benefit of this course is the ability to see a continuity of history: the actions of rulers and the reactions of the ruled follow recurring patterns through time. Students will be asked to describe this continuity. The past isn't dead; it isn't even past. (William Faulkner). A question for students to contemplate is this: How is the past living on in the present? General Education: C. 3 credits

GL-255W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Global Studies frame of reference. 3 credits

GL-323 - Islam and the West

Is the West, especially America, under siege from Islam? Is conflict between America and Islam inevitable? Or is there common ground? What has Islam contributed to the world and to the West? This course provides an overview of the relationship between Islam and the West, including the basics of the religion and civilization of Islam, the relationship of Islam to the West, and considerations concerning Muslims in Western countries, including America. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach, combining elements of history, religion, and culture. General Education: C. 3 credits

History (HI)

HI-111 - Western Civilization I

A survey of European cultures since the Renaissance designed to give an understanding of the major forces and events which have shaped the modern world. This course covers the period from the Renaissance to the French Revolution, including the Reformation, the age of religious wars, the rise of absolutism, and the Enlightenment. General Education: B. 3 credits

HI-112 - Western Civilization II

A survey of European cultures since the Renaissance designed to give an understanding of the major forces and events that have shaped the modern world. This course covers from the era of the French Revolution to the present, including romanticism, nationalism, industrialization, imperialism, fascism, and the two world wars. General Education: B. 3 credits

HI-121 - United States History I

A survey of United States history from the colonial period to the present. This course covers United States history through Reconstruction, including the colonial era, the age of the American Revolution, the early republic, and the sectional conflict. General Education: B. 3 credits

HI-122 - United States History II

This course covers United States history from Reconstruction to the present, including social and economic development in the late nineteenth century, populism, progressivism, the two world wars and the interwar period, as well as developments in American life since 1945. General Education: B. 3 credits

HI-140 - Migration and the City

Cities have long been centers of attraction and interaction between diverse groups drawn to the economic, social, and cultural opportunities provided by urban centers. This course provides an introduction to historical and contemporary issues of migration, residential mobility, housing and neighborhood change, and immigrant populations in urban centers. It explores the differences and commonalities between immigrant and non-immigrant communities, programs and policies tackling social and ethnic inequalities, and the creative development of arts, literature and music that arise from contact between people with different resources, abilities, preferences, and cultures. Attention will be paid to both domestic and international migrations. General Education: B. 3 credits

HI-150 - Rights, Slavery and Revolution

This course will analyze the period in world history where calls for human rights and freedom existed alongside a social and economic system of racial slavery. After situating European slavery in the context of the global economy, the course analyzes the French Revolution as a moment when the issue of human rights emerges in the West. The tension between slavery and human rights culminates with the Haitian Revolution, the first full-scale revolution for independence. The course concludes by asking questions about the place of that revolution in contemporary historical narratives. How does minimizing the Haitian revolution impact our understanding of that period, ideas of freedom and rights, and the idea of revolution itself? General Education: B. 3 credits

HI-150W - Rights, Slavery and Revolution

This course will analyze the period in world history where calls for human rights and freedom existed alongside a social and economic system of racial slavery. After situating European slavery in the context of the global economy, the course analyzes the French Revolution as a moment when the issue of human rights emerges in the West. The tension between slavery and human rights culminates with the Haitian Revolution, the first full-scale revolution for independence. The course concludes by asking questions about the place of that revolution in contemporary historical narratives. How does minimizing the Haitian revolution impact our understanding of that period, ideas of freedom and rights, and the idea of revolution itself? General Education: B. 3 credits

HI-252 - Topics in Historical Study

A course in European, American, or World History which will focus on a single topic or theme. 3 credits

HI-252W - Topics in Historical Study

A course in European, American, or World History which will focus on a single topic or theme. 3 credits

HI-253 - Topics in Historical Study

A course in European, American, or World History which will focus on a single topic or theme. 3 credits

HI-304 - History through Biography

This course will focus on biography as a form of historical inquiry, presenting examples of biography from diverse eras and with various approaches as well as subjects with distinctive problems. Additional readings from historians and writers will also help each student clarify a position on the nature of biography. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-311 - Renaissance and Reformation

An in-depth study of the European cultural reawakening of the 15th century and of the religious, intellectual, social, and political ferment of the era of the Reformation. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-315 - Nineteenth-Century Europe

A study of continental European history from the Congress of Vienna to World War I. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-316 - War and Peace in 20th Century Europe

A study of European history from World War I through the decades of Fascism and depression to the end of World War II. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-316W - War and Peace in the 20th Century Europe

A study of European history from World War I through the decades of Fascism and depression to the end of World War II. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-320 - History of Colonial America

A survey of early America from the late fifteenth century to the mid-eighteenth century. The course looks at Native American peoples and their initial contact with explorers and settlers and the continuing interactions of Americans, Europeans, and Africans throughout the era. Particular attention is given to comparative analysis of selected colonies and the types of social, economic, political, and cultural institutions that emerged. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-330 - History of Immigration

Why do Americans often view new cohorts of immigrants with fear and suspicion despite our being a nation of immigrants? This course will trace the experiences of various groups of immigrants to North America from the Colonial period to the present. The course will examine the push factors that compel immigrants to emigrate and the pull factors present in the United States that encourages them to immigrate. This course will also examine the reception of, struggles of, and pressures facing new groups of immigrants. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-334 - The Sixties: From Kennedy to Vietnam

A study of the domestic and foreign policies of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations with attention to the social, economic and cultural changes of the decade. Major emphasis is given to the question of economic prosperity and its impact upon society, the rights revolutions, youth culture, and Great Society programs. The course concludes with a study of American withdrawal from Vietnam, Watergate, and stagflation. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-341 - World Revolution in the Twentieth Century

A study of the major revolutions of the twentieth century with special attention to the theoretical approaches to the nature of revolution. Primary attention will be given to the Mexican Revolution of l9l0, the Russian Revolution of 1917, the Chinese Revolutions of 1911 and 1949, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-344 - African Slavery in the Atlantic World

The development of slavery in the Atlantic basin from its fifteenth-century beginnings through the nineteenth-century era of abolition with particular emphasis on the development of the slave trade, the evolution of slave cultures, economies, and societies in the New World and the impact of these on the Old World. The course will also explore the development of anti-slavery movements and demise of slavery. General Education: C. 3 credits

HI-355 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a historical frame of reference. 3 credits

HI-380 - Practicum

Fieldwork experience initiated with permission of the Department Chair. 2-12 credits

HI-385 - Historiography

An examination of the nature of the historical enterprise and historical methodology as well as prominent interpreters and interpretations of the past. Much of this seminar style course is devoted to critical analysis of the writings of historians and the preparation of a historiographic essay. P: Senior status. History majors only. 3 credits

HI-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

HI-391 - Senior Research Seminar

Required of all senior majors, students will research and write a significant essay based upon primary source material to the degree possible, in which they will demonstrate their mastery of the craft of History. P: HI 385. 3 credits

Human Services (HS)

HS-101 - Introduction to Human Services

An overview of the principles and practices of human services, including: concept of "cradle-to-grave" care and its implications; components of the human services delivery system; nature and current status of the various human services professions; social, occupational, and professional outlook for the near future; and personal and ethical issues involved in choosing to enter the human services field. 3 credits

HS-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Human Services frame of reference. 3 credits

HS-280 - Human Services Practicum I

A field experience with a Human Services agency. Students who intend to take Practicum I must see their academic advisor at the beginning of the semester. Practicum must be arranged through the Office of Career & Professional Development. This should be done no later than the middle of the semester prior to beginning the practicum placement. In addition, students must complete a preparatory workshop offered by the Office of Career & Professional Development during the semester before beginning their on-site work. 3 credits

HS-281 - Human Services Practicum II

A field experience with a Human Services agency. Students who intend to take Practicum II must see their academic advisor at the beginning of the semester. Practicum must be arranged through the Office of Career & Professional Development. This should be done no later than the middle of the semester prior to beginning the practicum placement. In addition, students must complete a preparatory workshop offered by the Office of Career & Professional Development during the semester before beginning their on-site work. 3 credits

HS-311 - Issues in Human Services

An in-depth examination of professional and personal issues relative to the human services professional. Consideration will be given to the position of human services organizations in government policy and the place of human services professionals in both public and private education, health care, and social welfare systems. Attention will also be given to the personal challenges faced by human services professionals, including typical occupational stressors and their impact, the importance of professionally ethical behavior, and ethical dilemmas that may be encountered. P: HS 101, HS 280, HS 281. 3 credits

Humanities (HU)

HU-101 - Introduction to College Life

A course designed to introduce incoming traditional undergraduate students to the concept of a Liberal Arts education and to assist students in making a successful transition into the Albertus Magnus College community. Through discussion and reflection, this course will identify campus resources and strategies for success that will help students develop their academic and personal goals. Students will participate in activities both in and out of the classroom that will help prepare them to become lifelong learners and vibrant members of the Albertus Magnus community. Required for incoming traditional undergraduate, first-year students. 1 credit

HU-108 - The Examined Life I

In the first semester, students begin to develop critical habits and thinking skills. Inspired, in part, by the "see, judge, act" method of analysis central to the tradition of Catholic Social Teaching, the course is composed of three major units 1) Who am I? 2) How should I think?; and 3) What should I do? In Unit 1.1 ("Who am I?") the endeavor begins with giving an account of oneself-historicizing one's experience, location, identity, aspirations, and convictions. Unit 1.2 ("How should I think?") has the goal of examining oneself by learning how to question assumptions and presuppositions. This involves both attitude and skill-a "courage to think for oneself" coupled with methods for doing so in a well-reasoned way. Unit 1.3 ("What can I do?") rounds out a "pursuit of truth that is practical in its application" and responsive to today's "ethical challenges" by arriving at the goal of justice-seeking. Here, students will learn how the critical dispositions and skills infused in the Liberal Arts tradition can and have been applied to address urgent contemporary problems. 3 credits

HU-109 - The Examined Life II

In the second semester, students apply the critical habits and skills developed in the first semester. In unit 1, students will identify the knowledge and skills from the first semester that are central to engaging with complex real world issues. After this brief introduction, individual instructors select two real-world "problems" that students in their section will familiarize themselves with and address in a collaborative and partially self-guided way. Mirroring the development of critical habits and skills in the first semester, students are invited to formulate crucial questions, identify and conduct necessary lines of research, schematize past, existing, and imaginable responses, critically evaluate possible courses of action, engage in experiences inside and outside of the classroom, produce events and artifacts that demonstrate the fruition of their work and conclusions drawn, and reflect on the learning experience and the merits of what has been accomplished. 3 credits

HU-111 - Reading Texts in Context I

This course seeks to expose students to classical and contemporary texts from the broad range of liberal arts disciplines and to enhance students' abilities to read texts intelligently. This required course is part of the general education curriculum. 3 credits

HU-111W - Reading Texts in Context I

This course seeks to expose students to classical and contemporary texts from the broad range of liberal arts disciplines and to enhance students' abilities to read texts intelligently. This required course is part of the general education curriculum. 3 credits

HU-112 - Reading Texts in Context II

This course seeks to expose students to classical and contemporary texts from the broad range of liberal arts disciplines and to enhance students' abilities to read texts intelligently. This required course is part of the general education curriculum. 3 credits

HU-112W - Reading Texts in Context II

This course seeks to expose students to classical and contemporary texts from the broad range of liberal arts disciplines and to enhance students' abilities to read texts intelligently. This required course is part of the general education curriculum. 3 credits

HU-113 - Invitation to Insight I

In this first of two courses in the College's General Education Insight Program, students employ the differing lenses of history, science, religions, literature, and art to begin a four-year journey exploring, from various viewpoints, what it means to be human. Using the rich resources of multiple perspectives and theories, students gain a "bird's eye view" of the human condition. This context serves as a provisional horizon against which, in subsequent courses in the Insight Program, individuals look more deeply at the significant particulars of the human condition in contemporary times. The course work in the first semester consists of three units: Cosmos (considering the human place in space and time), Bios (examining the remarkable phenomenon of life), and Homo sapiens (tracing the emergence and early experience of the human species). Through this exploration, students develop and enhance competencies in core skills essential to flourish in the contemporary world, especially in professional life. The course is designed with a strong emphasis on reading, writing, critical thinking, and collaborative learning. Required for first-year traditional undergraduate students. 3 credits

HU-114 - Invitation to Insight II

In this second course of the College's General Education Insight Program, students focus on the historical experience of the human species: Civitas (the age of civilizations), Modernity (the developments emanating from Europe in the sixteenth century of the modern era), and Post-Modernity (the contemporary moment). Through this exploration, students develop and enhance competencies in core skills essential to flourishing in the contemporary world, especially in professional life. The course is designed with a strong emphasis on reading, writing, critical thinking, and collaborative learning. Required for first-year traditional undergraduate students. 3 credits

HU-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within Humanities frame of reference. 3 credits

HU-255W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Humanities frame of reference. 3 credits

HU-321 - The Athlete and Sport Across Popular Media and Culture

This course will explore the athlete in sport by examining various representations of sports, the mind/body connection for the athlete, and socio-cultural factors and implications of sports, across a variety of media, including film, television, and the memoir. This inter- and multi- disciplinary course will draw upon literature from media studies, psychology, sociology, and philosophy to examine various narratives and theories of the athlete's journey, and sport in general. We will cover a variety of topics including narratives of greatness, injury, race, gender, ability, class, embodiment, setbacks, and institutions. General Education: C. 3 credits

HU-323 - Youth Activism Across the Americas Through Media and Culture (1920s-Present)

Within Childhood and Youth Studies, young people are often thought of in terms of futurity. Youth activism is one example that challenges this concept. Taking an anti-racist and anti-imperial approach, this course will survey youth activism across North and South America over the past one hundred years. Using multi- and inter- disciplinary approaches, we will explore various media coverage of real youth activists by examining news articles, television broadcasts, books, oral traditional stories, film and television presentations, as well as digital spaces including blogs, tiktok, youtube and other new media sites. We will also address the representation of the youth activist figure in popular culture today, situating them within a cultural-historical context. 3 credits

HU-325 - Cultures of Young People Through Media Texts

This course will draw upon literature from various disciplines including cultural studies, media studies, human geography, sociology and psychology to explore the many narratives of what constitutes childhood and teenagehood in different parts of the world, while problematizing the notion of the universal child's experience. By examining a variety of media texts including movies, TV, novels, children's books, and music, we will describe and analyze how meaning and cultural scripts compare to young people's real experiences in the world. Some topics we will cover include family, friendship, girlhood, boyhood, children's rights, work, play, coming of age, relationships, socio-economic class, race, ability, and religion. By exploring diverse experiences of young people, and by analyzing how they are represented across a variety of genres throughout film history, the course will draw attention to the ideological messages that inform social and cultural understandings of youth and the young person today. 3 credits

HU-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

HU-399 - Senior Humanities Seminar

A course of intensive reading from a variety of sources, designed to provide a forum for reflection and conversation regarding what it means to live life well. This required course is part of the general education curriculum. 3 credits

Languages & Cultures (LC)

LC-111I - Elementary Italian I

Introduction to basic language skills: listening, reading, practice in speaking and writing simple Italian. Includes study of contemporary Italian culture and civilization. 3 credits

LC-111S - Elementary Spanish I

Introduction to the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Classes are structured to provide extensive oral practice in Spanish. 3 credits

LC-111SL - American Sign Language I

American Sign Language is the mode of communication used by Deaf individuals in North America. This is a language comparable to any written or spoken language used throughout the world. ASL has its own syntax and strict rules and is very dynamic and complex in nature. While it is considered a difficult language to learn, it is a fun and exciting language to learn and use. 3 credits

LC-112I - Elementary Italian II

Introduction to basic language skills: listening, reading, practice in speaking and writing simple Italian. Includes study of contemporary Italian culture and civilization. P: LC 111I. 3 credits

LC-112S - Elementary Spanish II

Introduction to the basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Classes are structured to provide extensive oral practice in Spanish. P: LC 111S. 3 credits

LC-112SL - American Sign Language II

American Sign Language is the mode of communication used by Deaf individuals in North America. This is a language comparable to any written or spoken language used throughout the world. ASL has its own syntax and strict rules and is very dynamic and complex in nature. While it is considered a difficult language to learn, it is a fun and exciting language to learn and use. P: LC 111SL. 3 credits

LC-161S - Spanish in the Media I

In this course, students will approach the Spanish language through media such as ESPN Deportes, CNN, Telemundo, and Univision. Emphasis will be placed on attendance, active participation, viewing and listening comprehension, short quizzes, and a final ePortfolio project. The learning objectives for this course includes developing a precise vocabulary for spoken and written communication and cultural studies; and developing speaking, listening, and writing abilities at an elementary level. Offered by the Department of Languages and Cultures, this course fulfills one semester of the College's language requirement and/or a major/minor requirement in Spanish, or minor requirement in Spanish & Latin American Studies. General Education: LC. 3 credits

LC-162S - Spanish in the Media II

Emphasis will be placed on attendance, active participation, viewing and listening comprehension, short quizzes, and a final ePortfolio project. The learning objectives for this course includes developing a precise vocabulary for spoken and written communication and cultural studies; and developing speaking, listening, and writing abilities at an intermediate level. Offered by the Department of Languages and Cultures, this course fulfills one semester of the College's language requirement and/or a major/minor requirement in Spanish, or minor requirement in Spanish & Latin American Studies. P: LC 161S. General Education: LC. 3 credits

LC-190I - Independent Study in Italian

An individualized program of study at the elementary level. The student chooses, presents for approval and carries out an original project related to Italian language, literature, or culture. P: Permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

LC-190S - Independent Study in Spanish or Latin American Literature

An individualized program of study at the elementary level. A variety of student-oriented projects is possible including directed readings or individual research. P: Spanish proficiency and permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

LC-211S - Intermediate Spanish I

A continuation of the study of the essentials of grammar and pronunciation, with continued emphasis on oral performance. Includes increased practice in composition and reading. P: LC 111S, LC 112S. 3 credits

LC-212S - Intermediate Spanish II

A continuation of the study of the essentials of grammar and pronunciation, with continued emphasis on oral performance. Includes increased practice in composition and reading. P: LC 211S. 3 credits

LC-217S - Human Rights and Religious Witness in Latin America: a Film Course

The Americas - North, Central, and South - are the product of European colonial conquest of the Western Hemisphere five hundred years ago. This film course explores the consequences of this colonial origin and examines the cycle of oppression and resistance to oppression in Latin America, more specifically, in Mexico and Central America, from the conquest to the contemporary period. Eight films will dramatize the tragic, beautiful, and epic story of Latin America yesterday and today. Students will report on the films and their relationship to the context of globalizing forces of the Spanish conquest, colonialism, Christianity, trade, American hegemony in the western hemisphere, the Cold War, immigration, and human rights. For each of these globalizing forces, we will employ a twofold approach: (a) identify the actions of the colonial or governmental power and (b) describe the reactions of the Church and of the people. Associated with this approach, we will ask two sets of questions: (a) What justification did the colonial powers use to conquer, dominate, and enslave people? Likewise, in the postcolonial era, what justification did the independent governments use to suppress the people? (b) On the other side of the conflicts, what motivated the champions of human rights, who rose up in every age of this history to defend the indigenous peoples and the peasants? Their examples will lead us to a consideration of Liberation Theology. One benefit of this course is the ability to see a continuity of history: the actions of rulers and the reactions of the ruled follow recurring patterns through time. Students will be asked to describe this continuity. The past isn't dead; it isn't even past. (William Faulkner). A question for students to contemplate is this: How is the past living on in the present? General Education: C. 3 credits

LC-230S - Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition

Intensive review of Spanish language structure with emphasis on composition and conversation. The course prepares students for more advanced study of Spanish and Latin American cultures through extensive readings and in-class analysis. P: LC 211S, LC 212S. 3 credits

LC-231S - Conversational Spanish

A course that builds students' conversational skills in Spanish. While all four vital skills of language (speaking, listening, reading and writing) are targeted, the course emphasizes proficiency in oral communication skills. Students are required to practice Spanish through class discussions, presentations and reports. P: LC 211S, LC 212S and two years of successful high school Spanish. 3 credits

LC-244I - Italian Culture & Civilization

This course offers a review of basic elements of Italian culture. Students develop an appreciation and awareness of contrasts and comparisons with their own heritage. General Education: LC. 3 credits

LC-244S - The Cultures and Civilizations of the Spanish Speaking World

This course explores the various civilizations and cultures that contribute to the Spanish-speaking world. Students will gain knowledge of the Spanish/Latino/a/x individual through dialogue, readings, course assignments, and student-directed research. This course is designed to help the student gain a true global perspective and to realize the beauty in the diversity of Spain and Latin America, which is one of the underlying missions of Albertus Magnus College. Offered by the Department of Languages and Cultures, this course fulfills one semester of the College's language requirement and/or a minor in Global Studies or Spanish & Latin American Studies. This course fulfills one semester of the Spanish major or minor as well. The course will be taught in English with frequent references and proper names in Spanish. The course integrates the four basic skills of foreign language acquisition-reading, writing, speaking, and listening-in addition to cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. General Education: LC. 3 credits

LC-247S - Introduction to Hispanic & Latinx Studies

This course is an introduction to Hispanic and Latinx Studies in the United States. The course investigates the historical, socio-economic conditions and experiences of Latinx with particular attention to structural inequalities, identity construction and migration. General Education: C. 3 credits

LC-253S - Doing Business in the Spanish-Speaking World

This course prepares business and Spanish minors/majors for successful interaction within the Hispanic business world by building upon their existing knowledge and providing the tools needed to know, understand, and learn the principal concepts, measures, and policies that govern business within the Spanish-speaking world. The course also prepares the student to be alert to the importance of cultural awareness in doing business in Spanish-speaking countries or with Hispanics in the United States and to appreciate Spanish Speaking Countries' developments and progress within the business world. Offered by the Department of Languages and Cultures, this course fulfills one semester of the College's language requirement and/or a major/minor requirement in Spanish, or minor requirement in Spanish & Latin American Studies. The course will be taught in English with frequent references and relevant terms in Spanish. The course integrates the four basic skills of foreign language acquisition-reading, writing, speaking, and listening-in addition to cultural awareness of the Spanish-speaking world. General Education: LC. 3 credits

LC-260SW - Issues of Anxiety & Assimilation in Puerto Rican and Nuyorican Literature

Students will read and critically analyze several important Puerto Rican novels, short stories, essays, films and music from the 20th century to see how they influence (or are influenced by) national identity or history. Julia de Burgos, Willie Perdomo, Pedro Pietri, Tato laviera, Lin Manuel Miranda, Antonio Pedreira, Rosario Ferré, Piri Thomas, Ana Lydia Vega, Esmeralda Santiago, and Jack Agüeros figure among the influential writers that we will read this semester. Emphasis will be placed on digital literacy, written and oral communication. Offered in English or Spanish. General Education: B. 3 credits

LC-261S - 20th & 21st Century Spanish and Latin American Film

Students will view and critically analyze several important Latin American and Spanish films from the early 1980s - 2011. Emphasis will be placed on our on-line discussions and essay writing. The learning objectives for this course include developing a precise vocabulary for cultural studies; developing a deeper understanding of the diverse history, art, and cultures of Central America, Latin America, and Spain; and developing speaking, listening, and writing abilities at an advanced level. Because of its fast pace and intense writing demands, preparation in advance is essential. Offered in English or Spanish. General Education: B. 3 credits

LC-290I - Independent Study in Italian

An individualized program of study at the advanced intermediate level. The student chooses, presents for approval and carries out an original project related to Italian language, literature, or culture. P: Permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

LC-290S - Independent Study in Spanish or Latin American Literature

An individualized program of study at the advanced intermediate level. A variety of student-oriented projects is possible including directed readings or individual research. P: Spanish proficiency and permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

LC-341S - Major Writers of Latin American Literature

A study of the major works of Latin American literature from modernismo, through the "Boom" and the contemporary period. Students learn of the rise of independent forms of cultural expression from the diverse genres of poetry, prose, and theater. Writers studied include Rubén Darío, José Martí, Jorge Luis Borges, Alfonsina Storni, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel García Márquez, Julio Cortázar, Carlos Fuentes, and Antonio Skármeta. General Education: B. 3 credits

LC-342S - Revolutionary Literature & Culture of Cuba

Students will examine and consider the paradoxical relationship between revolutionary politics and the arts in 20th-century Cuba, while noting recent political, social, and economic changes that have occurred in 21st-century Cuba. Emphasis will be placed on attendance, improved digital literacy, in-class discussions, and a final ePortfolio project. The learning objectives for this course include developing a precise vocabulary for cultural studies; developing a deeper understanding of the history, culture, economics and politics of Cuba; and developing speaking, listening, and writing abilities at an advanced level. Offered in English or Spanish. General Education: C. 3 credits

LC-343SW - The Short Stories of Borges, Kafka and Poe

Students will read several short stories from Argentine writer, Jorge Luis Borges. Borges' short narratives will be studied in depth and compared/contrasted with the narrative works of Franz Kafka and Edgar Allan Poe. This is a W course with a strong written component. Students are expected to research and write several shorter papers along with one final research paper (MLA format and Bibliography). This course will be conducted in English and/or in Spanish and is highly recommended for students majoring or minoring in Spanish. Native speakers are encouraged to register as well. General Education: C. 3 credits

LC-354S - Special Topics in Latin American Literature

A study of significant areas of Hispanic culture through the exploration of a particular theme rather than genre or period. Topics ranging from year to year may include Women Writers of Latin America, Poetry and Politics, Social Drama, Creolization and Literature in the Caribbean. May be taken more than once for credit if topics differ. General Education: C. 3 credits.

LC-354SW - Special Topics in Latin American Literature

A study of significant areas of Hispanic culture through the exploration of a particular theme rather than genre or period. Topics ranging from year to year may include Women Writers of Latin America, Poetry and Politics, Social Drama, Creolization and Literature in the Caribbean. May be taken more than once for credit if topics differ. General Education: C. 3 credits.

LC-390I - Independent Study in Italian

An individualized program of study at the advanced level. The student chooses, presents for approval and carries out an original project related to Italian language, literature, or culture. P: Permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

LC-390S - Independent Study in Spanish or Latin American Literature

An individualized program of study at the advanced level. A variety of student-oriented projects is possible including directed readings or individual research. P: Spanish proficiency and permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

LC-391S - Practicum

Supervised practical experience. With the approval of the Department Chair, a limited number of students may be placed in a variety of positions where the student's principal activity centers on communication in Spanish. Suggested practica may include teaching practice at area schools or business internships with a focus on Spanish language usage. Student's minoring in Spanish and Spanish and Latin American Studies are strongly encouraged to do a practicum. P: 18 credit-hours in Spanish and permission of the Department Chair. 3-12 credits

LC-395S - Departmental Seminar

An integrated study of a particular theme, topic, or genre. Possible topics include the Renaissance in Spain, Existentialism in the Contemporary Novel, Cervantes and the Rise of the Novel, among others. P: Spanish proficiency and permission of the Department Chair. 3 credits

LC-395SW - Departmental Seminar

An integrated study of a particular theme, topic, or genre. Possible topics include the Renaissance in Spain, Existentialism in the Contemporary Novel, Cervantes and the Rise of the Novel, among others. P: Spanish proficiency and permission of the Department Chair. 3 credits

Liberal Studies (LS)

LS-210 - Aquinas Program Project I

This course focuses on identifying and refining a research topic that will culminate into a final research paper to be completed the following semester. This course aims to instill foundational knowledge on scholarship and research. Students will complete an annotated bibliography to gain a deep understanding of the subject matter and its relevance/application to today's society. Additionally, through participation in cultural events and activities students will be given the opportunity to reflect on the value of a liberal arts education. 4 credits

LS-211 - Aquinas Program Project II

This course aims to instill foundational knowledge on scholarship and research. It is the second part of the Aquinas Scholars program. This semester will culminate in a final research paper and presentation to the college. Additionally, through participation in cultural events and activities students will be given the opportunity to reflect on the value of a liberal arts education. 4 credits

LS-380 - Internship

Students undertake a significant experiential learning opportunity, typically with a company, non-profit, governmental, or community-based organization. The internship represents an educational strategy that links classroom learning and student interest with the acquisition of knowledge in an applied work setting. Through direct observation, reflection and evaluation, students gain an understanding of the internship site's work, mission, and audience, how these potentially relate to their academic study, as well as the organization's position in the broader industry or field. 3 credits

LS-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 3 credits

Management (MG)

MG-131 - Principles of Management

Students are introduced to the basic functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling the organization effectively and efficiently. Additional topics include social responsibility of the organization, decision-making, interpersonal skills, and organizational change. 3 credits

MG-142 - Introduction to Project Management

This course will introduce students to the power of effective project management through two primary frameworks: waterfall and agile. Students will also learn vital project-management concepts that can be applied to a wide range of industries and occupations. This class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

MG-228 - International Business Management

Students analyze foreign environment elements and the role of each element as firms select market entry options. Specific emphasis is given to ethical strategic planning of human resources, marketing, finance, and the relationship between the corporation and its host country in establishing the international business operations. P: MG 131. 3 credits

MG-231 - Principles of Marketing

This course introduces students to common methods of planning and implementing decisions with respect to product, price, promotion, and channels of distribution, as organizations strive to satisfy the needs and wants of the market while achieving the goals of the organization in a dynamic environment. 3 credits

MG-235 - Healthcare Management

Students are introduced to the various types of healthcare facilities and the vital role of utilizing people effectively to meet the organizational objectives. The course emphasizes the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling in the healthcare environment. P: MG 131. 3 credits

MG-240 - Social Entrepreneurship

This course focuses on social entrepreneurship, including for benefit business formation and the idea of a b-corp, grant-writing, and the values-based pitch. Students develop an idea for a nonprofit or mission-based enterprise, and learn to use social impact as a success metric. 3 credits

MG-241 - Marketing Research and Strategy

This course will utilize marketing research tools, processes, and results to assist managers, particularly marketing managers, in the decision-making process as it relates to developing a cohesive marketing strategy for a particular market and/or business. It will also examine the critical relationship between research and the function of market planning and overall business strategy. A strong Internet focus allows students to gather market research data efficiently and effectively. Topics include research design, sampling methods, collecting both primary data (via questionnaires, interviews, and focus groups) and secondary data, interpreting data, and presenting results. P: MG 231. 3 credits

MG-251 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Management frame of reference. 3 credits

MG-251W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Management frame of reference. 3 credits

MG-255 - Sourcing and Operations

This course provides an overview of sourcing and operations. It is divided into two parts. In the first part, students will learn the key components of sourcing: supplier selection, supplier segmentation, make vs buy decisions and supplier relationships. In the second part, students will learn both the Lean Inventory methodology and the Six Sigma methodology. This will allow them to improve supply chain operations. Students will have the opportunity to apply this knowledge to a product of their choosing. Lastly the course will be supplemented by guest lecturers who have significant experience in supply chain management. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

MG-261 - Project Planning

This course provides students with a deep understanding of project planning. Projects are a series of tradeoffs between scope, cost, and time. Students will learn how to balance them in order to create a plan which is realistic and achievable. Students will also learn how to leverage resources, and how to manage risk, quality, and stakeholder expectations to ensure project success. This class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: MG 142. 3 credits

MG-270 - Moral Leadership: Defining the Character of Individuals in Organizations

Students will explore two important and related topics: leadership and ethics in business. Questions that will be explored include: What is business leadership? Does it have an impact on organizational performance? Where are leaders in organizations and what are their roles? What roles do leaders play in shaping the culture of right and wrong within the organization? General Education: C. 3 credits

MG-308 - Ethical Issues in Healthcare

From biomedical research to clinical practice to policy and planning, healthcare managers face ethical issues in every aspect of their work. In this course, students explore their own values and moral principles in relation to healthcare; consider various professional codes of ethics; and apply systematic approaches to ethical decision-making to cases related to healthcare access; client self-determination; privacy; cultural and religious diversity; and the economics of the healthcare system. General Education: C. 3 credits

MG-311 - Introduction to Public Health

The public health system is charged with assessing and promoting the health of communities and diverse populations. This course introduces the core public health disciplines of epidemiology, biostatistics, environmental health, social and behavioral health, and health policy and management. Students explore historical and contemporary public health approaches to promoting healthy behaviors; responding to emerging diseases; identifying environmental risk factors; preparing for and managing disasters; and alleviating health disparities across populations. General Education: C. 3 credits

MG-312 - Global Health

Global Health examines the socioeconomic, biological and environmental causes and the consequences of disease. In an increasingly interconnected world, students consider the impact of infectious diseases; poverty and hunger; violence and war; environmental disruption; natural disasters and humanitarian crises for local and global health and wellbeing. Students explore their possible roles in solving global health crises, such as promoting human rights; applying new technologies; and financing and managing international agencies, NGOs, philanthropy, and emerging public and private healthcare systems. General Education: C. 3 credits

MG-315 - Nonprofit Fundraising and Introduction to Foundation Grant Writing

Through this course, students will gain insight into best practices in nonprofit fundraising, including an introduction into the world of foundation grant writing. Topics covered include: history of charitable giving, rationale for donor giving, legal and organizational aspects of a nonprofit corporation, Internal Revenue Code requirements related to charitable giving, creating a plan of development, creating as case statement, the donor cycle, and an introduction to private foundation grant research, writing, and submission. The course generally includes an experiential component in which students prepare and submit a grant application to a local foundation. 3 credits

MG-315W - Nonprofit Fundraising and Introduction to Foundation Grant Writing

Through this course, students will gain insight into best practices in nonprofit fundraising, including an introduction into the world of foundation grant writing. Topics covered include: history of charitable giving, rationale for donor giving, legal and organizational aspects of a nonprofit corporation, Internal Revenue Code requirements related to charitable giving, creating a plan of development, creating as case statement, the donor cycle, and an introduction to private foundation grant research, writing, and submission. The course generally includes an experiential component in which students prepare and submit a grant application to a local foundation. 3 credits

MG-320 - Product Development

In this course, students will experience a "hands-on" practical application of researching and developing a product from idea generation through the various stages to commercial introduction. Management and control of the product through the product cycle will be discussed as well as an examination of product successes and failures. P: MG 231. 3 credits

MG-322 - Promotional Marketing

This course allows students to experience designing, managing, and evaluating an organization's promotion program: advertising, sale promotion, personal selling, and publicity. Students create complete promotion programs for a product and a service and analyze the integration of the promotional elements as well as examine the influence the 4P's have on their promotional decisions. P: MG 231. 3 credits

MG-328 - International Marketing

This course teaches students to conduct a strategic analysis of world markets in terms of their respective cultural, economic, political, financial, legal, and competitive forces to determine various entry options available to multinational companies. Development of the particular marketing strategy and the 4 P's in the international arena will be explored. P: MG 231. 3 credits

MG-329 - Global Issues

This course introduces students to the concept of culture and allows them to discover how aspects of culture have formed who they are and how cultural value orientations drive assumptions and behaviors in ourselves and in others. Globalization, one of the most debated topics in social sciences, will be discussed and analyzed. Current and critical global business issues will be analyzed from a variety of viewpoints. General Education: LC. 3 credits

MG-335 - Human Resource Law

In this course students examine the American labor force, the laws and regulations that protect it, and the federal agencies involved in enhancing worker's rights. Union structure, operation, and relations will be discussed as well as employee relations in non-union organizations and in the public section. 3 credits

MG-336 - Healthcare Law

An examination of the laws and regulations which protect and govern healthcare facilities and programs. Special attention is paid to the rights and protection afforded to users of healthcare facilities. General Education: C. 3 credits

MG-337 - Human Resource Recruiting and Selection

This course introduces the student to the importance of planning and conducting a needs assessment for effective and efficient recruiting. Students will also examine how and where to recruit, as well as the legal aspects of gathering a pool of potential candidates. Students will also learn the techniques of screening candidates to acquire those who best fit the organization's needs. The course is a combination of theory and practical application. P: MG 362. 3 credits

MG-339 - International Human Resource Management

Students will study the vital role of utilizing people effectively to meet the multinational corporation's foreign country objectives. Topics include planning personnel needs, recruiting and selecting employees, training and developing the workforce, performance evaluation, compensation in the foreign country, as well as the foreign legal and social context in which human resource management must operate. P: MG 362. 3 credits

MG-340 - Project Management

This course covers principles, practices, and techniques for the management of temporary organizations (also known as project management). This course is broadly applicable to any student with an interest in how change is implemented in real world organizations through the use of project management. Core topics include initiation, planning, execution, monitoring, and closure of projects. This course uses the Microsoft Project software package extensively to provide hands-on planning experience. General Education: C. 3 credits

MG-348 - Data Analysis for Healthcare Managers

In this course, students will be introduced to the analytic tools needed to understand and assess the data collected by healthcare organizations. Students will learn how various healthcare data sets are constructed and utilized by healthcare managers for efficient and effective decision-making. The students will apply these techniques and interpret case study data. P: BE 202. 3 credits

MG-350 - Forecasting and Logistics

This course provides a broad overview of the planning and execution of customer demand. It is divided into two parts: forecasting and logistics. In the first segment, we cover the three major building blocks of logistics networks: transportation, warehousing, and inventory. After completing this section, you will be able to differentiate the advantages and disadvantages of different modes of transportation and understand what goes into designing and setting up a warehousing facility. In the second segment, we cover planning and forecasting. You will master different forecasting techniques essential for building a sales forecast and build the tools and techniques to analyze demand data and construct different forecasting techniques. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

MG-362 - Human Resource Management

In this course, students study the vital role of utilizing people effectively to meet organizational objectives. Topics include planning personnel needs, recruiting and selecting employees, training and developing the workforce, performance evaluation, compensation, and the legal and social context in which human resource management must operate. P: MG 131. 3 credits

MG-365 - Issues of Small and Family Business

This course introduces students to the issues that confront small and family businesses, and explores how to create a new small business. The study of small businesses allows students to study organizations in a more holistic manner. P: MG 131, MG 231, BE 161. 3 credits

MG-367 - Strategic Management

Students will analyze the concepts and formulation of business strategy in the complete business environment. Roles and actions of top management in developing and implementing policy and strategy will be examined and analyzed in diverse industries, various types and sizes of organizations, and in a variety of situations. P: MG 131. 3 credits

MG-370 - Project Execution, Monitoring & Control, Implementation & Closure

This course will prepare students for the unforeseen challenges and changing priorities that accompany any project. Students will be exposed to the various ways a manager can promote trust and conviction in processes and personnel. Students will also learn project execution, monitoring / control, implementation / handover, DevOps, and project closure techniques. The course is intended to finalize a student's preparation for their Project Management Practicum and Internship. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: MG 142, MG 261. 3 credits

MG-380 - Management Internship

This is a field-based course in which students gain on-site employment experience in a local business establishment for 120 contact hours per 3 credits. The student is responsible for maintaining an integrative journal and completing other academic requirements. A student may repeat this course only once, and the second internship must be in a different place of employment. P: 12 credits in management. 3-12 credits

MG-382 - Entrepreneurship Internship

In this supervised internship, students work to develop their business idea into an actual business operation or business plan, using the college's co-working space or an outside co-working space as their base of operations. P: 12 credits in management. 3-12 credits

MG-383 - Healthcare Management Internship

This is a field-based course in which students gain on-site employment experience in a local healthcare or healthcare-related business for 120 contact hours per 3 credits. The student is responsible for maintaining an integrative journal and completing other academic requirements. A student may repeat this course only once, and the second internship must be in a different place of employment. P: 12 credits in management. 3-12 credits

MG-384 - Supply Chain Management Practicum

This course asks students to apply the skills they have learned in their business and supply chain management education to a series of challenges. In the first part, students solve challenges in logistics, operations, planning, and sourcing faced by a fictional company. In the second part, students will be tasked with addressing a real supply chain problem. Students will take on the role of supply chain consultants, redesigning the existing supply chain of a consumer products company with the goals of implementing lean inventory management, and using six sigma processes to improve efficiency and allow the company to bring new products to market more rapidly. At the end of the course, students will have real world experience that they can show employers as part of a larger portfolio. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

MG-385 - Advanced Project Management Practicum

This course is intended as a culmination of a student's work in the Project Management major. Students will work in groups to manage a simulated project from scope to completion - encountering - and overcoming - challenges and complications along the way. This course will also provide students with an overview of the product life-cycle, governance, and other topics to help contextualize project work. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: MG 142, MG 261, MG 370. 3 credits

MG-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

MG-391 - Business Capstone

The objective of this capstone course is to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate knowledge gained from all other business courses through the analysis of case studies and simulations. Students learn to formulate strategic decisions that guide the future direction of the organization. P: Senior standing and completion of BE 161, BE 205, MG 131, MG 231, and 5 courses in the student's concentration. 3 credits

MG-391W - Business Capstone

The objective of this capstone course is to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate knowledge gained from all other business courses through the analysis of case studies and simulations. Students learn to formulate strategic decisions that guide the future direction of the organization. P: Senior standing and completion of BE 161, BE 205, MG 131, MG 231, and 5 courses in the student's concentration. 3 credits

MG-392 - Healthcare Management Capstone

This capstone course is designed to integrate knowledge and skills from previous coursework and field experiences. Focus will be on key issues impacting the management of today's healthcare organizations and students will develop an individual research project that explores how those issues impact the delivery of care. The extent and format of the project will be agreed upon with the instructor. Students will present their findings to the class at the end of the course. P: MG 348. 3 credits

Mathematics (MA)

MA-100 - Introduction to College Math

This course will teach students the skills necessary for further study in most disciplines and includes the algebra necessary for the next level of mathematics courses. Students will be encouraged to reason mathematically, so that they can enhance their abilities to learn mathematics. 3 credits

MA-111 - Mathematical Ideas

Various mathematical concepts (e.g., graphs, probability) will be discussed for their own sake and as applied to concrete problems. Connections between various parts of mathematics will be stressed when feasible. P: MA 100 or its equivalent. General Education: A. 3 credits

MA-116 - College Mathematics

A course in college mathematics including mathematical applications of solving equations and inequalities, linear programming, probability and combinatorics, as well as exponents. P: MA 100 or its equivalent. General Education: A. 3 credits

MA-120 - Pre-Calculus

For students who require review and extension of mathematical background before undertaking the more advanced calculus courses. Topics include numbers, functions, graphing, exponential functions, logarithmic functions, and trigonometry. P: MA 100 or its equivalent. General Education: A. 3 credits

MA-121 - Calculus I

Presentation of the fundamental concepts of functions, limits, and differential calculus with an introduction to integral calculus. Techniques and applications of differentiation and calculating areas as limits are explored. Serves as a first course for mathematics and science majors. P: MA 120 or its equivalent. General Education: A. 4 credits

MA-122 - Calculus II

Further extensive study of the fundamental concepts of differential and integral calculus. Topics include logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions, integration techniques, applications of the definite integral, and infinite series. P: MA 121 or its equivalent. General Education: A. 4 credits

MA-215 - Differential Equations

An intermediate follow-on course to the calculus sequence building on much of that subject matter and hence highlighting the use and importance of calculus. The course is designed to develop a tool kit of solution techniques which can be used to solve ordinary differential equations including first order equations and higher order linear equations. Topics include first order equations, higher order linear equations, Laplace transforms, systems of equations, power series solutions, numerical methods, and practical applications to science. P: MA 122. 3 credits

MA-230W - History of Mathematics

A study of dominant trends in the historical development of mathematics. Study of the growth of various branches of mathematics will be supplemented by historical background material, biographies of mathematicians, and translations of original sources. P: MA 111, MA 116, MA 120 or MA 121. 3 credits

MA-232 - Advanced Calculus

Continuation of MA 121 and MA 122 leading to an introduction to differential and integral calculus for functions of several variables. Topics include infinite series, vectors, vector functions, surfaces in three-dimensional space, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and vector calculus, implicit function theorem, and Green's and Stokes' Theorems. P: MA 121, MA 122. 4 credits

MA-233 - Linear Algebra

The study of mathematical systems with emphasis on vector spaces, linear transformations, and matrices including geometric interpretations and applications. Topics include systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear mappings, determinants, and eigenvalue problems. P: MA 121. 3 credits

MA-242 - Linear Optimization

An introduction to the application of linear mathematical models used for optimization and to support decision-making processes. Emphasis will be on formulating mathematical models of various problems encountered by decision-makers, developing and solving spreadsheet models, and interpreting their solutions. Topics include linear programming, sensitivity analysis, integer programming, network modeling, multiple objective programming, regression analysis, and time series forecasting. Computer analysis is utilized. P: MA 233. 3 credits

MA-275 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Mathematics frame of reference. 1-3 credits

MA-315 - Geometry

The study of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. The history of geometry, structure of geometry, relationships between various parts of geometry, relationships between theorems, styles, and techniques of proofs will be studied. P: MA 233. 3 credits

MA-345 - Probability

The basic concepts of probability will be covered to form the foundation for statistical methods and applications. Topics include data collection and presentation, numerical descriptive measures, probability rules, discrete and continuous random variables, probability distributions, the central limit theorem, sampling distributions, and confidence interval estimation. P: MA 120 or MA 121. 3 credits

MA-351 - Statistical Methods

A mathematical development of statistical procedures that builds upon the topics covered in probability and introduces concepts of estimation, confidence intervals, hypotheses testing, contingency tables, goodness of fit, analysis of variance, correlation, regression, nonparametric methods and their applications. Emphasis is on practical applications of the statistical methods using statistical software. P: MA 345. 3 credits

MA-380 - Internship

Supervised field experience with permission of the Mathematics Program Director. 3 credits

MA-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

MA-391 - Senior Seminar

Topics may vary. Typically, a topic will be chosen that pulls together previous courses, e.g., Differential equations (calculus & linear algebra). P: MA 122, MA 233. 3 credits

Music (MU)

MU-111 - Introduction to Music

Discussion and demonstration of music as a means of emotional expression and communication throughout various historical eras. The course deals first with musical basics such as instruments of the orchestra, elementary theory, musical structure, and syntax. These skills will then be applied to a deepened understanding of the evolution of musical styles from the Renaissance to the present with class and outside-of-class listening to recordings of representative masterworks. General Education: A. 3 credits

MU-122 - Chorus I

Albertus Magnus' primary vocal ensemble; Chorus performs for campus liturgies, ceremonies, and concerts, in musical styles from classical to pop. 1 credit

MU-123 - Chorus II

Albertus Magnus' primary vocal ensemble; Chorus performs for campus liturgies, ceremonies, and concerts, in musical styles from classical to pop. 1 credit

MU-124 - Chorus III

Albertus Magnus' primary vocal ensemble; Chorus performs for campus liturgies, ceremonies, and concerts, in musical styles from classical to pop. 1 credit

MU-125 - Chorus IV

Albertus Magnus' primary vocal ensemble; Chorus performs for campus liturgies, ceremonies, and concerts, in musical styles from classical to pop. 1 credit

MU-126 - Chorus V

Albertus Magnus' primary vocal ensemble; Chorus performs for campus liturgies, ceremonies, and concerts, in musical styles from classical to pop. 1 credit

MU-127 - Chorus VI

Albertus Magnus' primary vocal ensemble; Chorus performs for campus liturgies, ceremonies, and concerts, in musical styles from classical to pop. 1 credit

MU-128 - Chorus VII

Albertus Magnus' primary vocal ensemble; Chorus performs for campus liturgies, ceremonies, and concerts, in musical styles from classical to pop. 1 credit

MU-190 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, explore special interests in music study outside the scope of existing courses. 1-12 credits

MU-212 - Jazz: The American Heritage

Historical and aural examination of America's indigenous music. This course will trace the genesis of the early New Orleans style of Jazz, listen to work songs and blues, and follow the musical changes to the present. General Education: A. 3 credits

MU-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a musical frame of reference. 3 credits

MU-290 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, explore special interests in music study outside the scope of existing courses. 1-12 credits

MU-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, explore special interests in music study outside the scope of existing courses. 1-12 credits

Philosophy (PH)

PH-111 - Critical Reasoning

Today perhaps more than ever, we need to be able to assess the claims and arguments we encounter on our media landscape. What makes an argument strong, or weak? How can rhetoric make an argument more compelling, or be used to hide flaws in an argument? In this course, students acquire the tools to assess the claims and arguments of others and build strong arguments for their own views. We skirt the complexities of formal, symbolic logic and dive into the "art" of critical reasoning. General Education: B. 3 credits.

PH-211 - Ancient Greek Thought

A survey of ancient Greek thought, especially as represented by Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. We begin from the pre-Socratics: Thales, Anaximander, Anaximenes, Pythagorus, Heraclitus, and Parmenides. We then turn to Socrates, as portrayed in Plato's Apology and other dialogue, and look at how Plato, a student of Socrates, developed his teacher's way of thinking. On this basis we turn to the work of Aristotle, a student of Plato, including readings from his Nicomachean Ethics and Politics. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-220 - Introduction to Western Philosophy

What does it mean to look at the world philosophically? In this course, we will examine the nature of philosophical inquiry and the major philosophical questions that have animated much of Western philosophy, such as: What does it mean to be a human being? What is love? Is it better to question or to follow tradition? In the West, it was the ancient Greeks who first struggled to engage such questions. The course will focus on their struggle, examining the works of the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and others. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-224 - Modern Philosophy

This course explores the impact that the development of the modern world, including the scientific revolution, the building of nation states, and the exploration of the natural world, has had on shaping our understanding of ourselves and our capacity to know and appreciate the world(s) in which we live. By drawing on the work of prominent modern philosophers, students will endeavor to understand and critically evaluate the modern understanding of the self and its place in the world. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-225 - Contemporary Philosophy

If the modern period was one of optimism in which people came to believe that through the use of reason and the advances of science it would be possible to build a better world, the postmodern age is one in which such dreams are viewed with skepticism. On the other hand, we find in postmodernity an invitation to think differently and to thereby discover new ways of being in the world and with one another. This course provides an opportunity to explore these new paths of thinking by drawing upon the works of such 19th and 20th century thinkers as Nietzsche, Marx, Kuhn, Heidegger, Foucault, Butler, and Irigaray, thinkers who encourage us to reappraise human beings' relation to themselves, nature, society, and the divine. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-235 - Black Radical Thought

How has philosophy shaped struggles for black liberation? This course surveys several currents of intellectual and political activity aimed at forms of the black struggle for liberation that lie outside of the political mainstream. Students are first introduced to the philosophies of G.W.F. Hegel and Karl Marx. Then, they trace the way this tradition's themes have served as both an important influence and a point of contestation in the writings of 20th- and 21st-century black writers, activists, and movements. Examples include W.E.B Dubois, Aime Cesaire, C. L. R. James, Martin Luther King, Jr., Frantz Fanon, Angela Y. Davis, black and Third World feminisms, black nationalism, the black power movement, pan-Africanism, the Women of Color movement, black labor movements, black socialism, Black Lives Matter, and the prison abolition movement. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-237 - Capitalism and Society

How does capitalism promote the principles of freedom and equal dignity that define a democratic society? How does it organize relations between labor, capital, and governments? In this course, students learn about the origins of the capitalist system in Europe and its global diffusion through the system of European colonialism. Through primary texts, they become familiar with historical debates among political philosophers from the 17th-century to today about the advantages and disadvantages of capitalism (John Locke, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, Karl Marx, Friedrich Hayek, John Maynard Keynes, Milton Friedman, Joseph Stiglitz, David Harvey, and others). Then, they trace the influence of these debates on approaches to contemporary social, political, and economic issues such as inequality, poverty, global economic development, race, the women's movement, housing, economic migration, indigenous sovereignty struggles, neoliberalism, neoimperialism, climate change, and labor trends. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-251 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a philosophical frame of reference. 3 credits

PH-261 - Social & Political Philosophy

What is the best form of government? What makes a government legitimate? What should the relationship be between the individual and the state, and between states and other states? In this course, we will trace the development of social and political theory in an attempt to critically consider the possible responses that one can offer to such questions. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-265W - Philosophy of Art

What is art? What is its purpose? Is there a standard of beauty, or simply individual tastes? What is the role of the art critic? What is art's relationship with society? Is there a conflict between art and commercial culture? This course will familiarize students with four philosophical theories or approaches to art: art as pleasure, art as beauty, art as emotion, and art as a way of understanding the world. Students read classic and contemporary texts in philosophical aesthetics that include such authors as Aristotle, David Hume, John Stuart Mill, Immanuel Kant, G. W. F. Hegel, Friedrich Nietzsche, Martin Heidegger, Walter Benjamin, Theodor Adorno, Susan Sontag, Rosalind Krauss, Arthur Danto, Frederic Jameson, and others. Emphasis is placed on issues relating to modern and contemporary art and students will visit an art gallery. Modeling art-world genres of written expression such as artifact descriptions, art exhibition reviews, art criticism, and art essays, this course improves written communication skills and satisfies the W-course General Education requirement. General Education: B. 3 credits

PH-303 - Urban Planning Studio

This course explores the historical and contemporary dimensions of how cities form and develop and how human interventions shape these complex processes. Students draw from a diverse range of sources and disciplines to examine the past, present, and future of cities by looking at four distinct yet interrelated themes: environment, equity, economy, and culture. These themes are used to explore cities you might be familiar with, such as New York City, as well as our context here in New Haven. As a Studio course, students participate in a major problem-based learning project, centered in New Haven, that involves research, strategization, collaboration, and partnerships with local officials and agencies. The studio project varies from term to term and addresses a local current issue, such as housing equity and accessibility, greenspace preservation and urban ecological practices, multi-modal transit expansion, and neighborhood integration and social inclusion strategies. General Education: C. 3 credits

PH-315 - Environmental Ethics

How do we best understand humanity's relationship to the environment, and what actions and policies should follow from that understanding? This course will focus on the responses of various ethical traditions and will consider ways that traditional anthropology and cosmology and even theology are being transformed in response to perceived environmental degradation. General Education: C. 3 credits

PH-321 - Modern Art and Architecture

This course introduces students to the Modernist movement in art and architecture and the currents that came after it. Capitalizing on our proximity to fine examples of Modern art and architecture in New Haven, students are given opportunities to learn beyond the classroom. Visual art movements covered include impressionism, expressionism, Dada, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, conceptual art, minimalism, Earthwork, site-specific art, and video art. In architecture, students become acquainted with Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the Bauhaus, the International Style, Postmodern innovators from Phillip Johnson and Frank Gehry, and recent artists who cross boundaries between art and architecture, such as Olalekan Jeyifous and Patricia Johanson. Aesthetic tropes are examined and evaluated, including realism, disorder, fragmentation, the sublime, irony, pastiche, surface, depth, ruins, and everydayness. As an interdisciplinary course bridging Art History and Philosophy students are also introduced to theorists of art, culture, and architecture who have not only observed these movements but in some cases shaped them. They range from Charles Baudelaire and Freidrich Nietzsche to Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Frederic Jameson, Jean Baudrillard, Jean Francois Lyotard, Robert Venturi, Charles Jencks, and others. General Education: C. 3 credits

PH-321W - Modern Art and Architecture

This course introduces students to the Modernist movement in art and architecture and the currents that came after it. Capitalizing on our proximity to fine examples of Modern art and architecture in New Haven, students are given opportunities to learn beyond the classroom. Visual art movements covered include impressionism, expressionism, Dada, surrealism, abstract expressionism, pop art, conceptual art, minimalism, Earthwork, site-specific art, and video art. In architecture, students become acquainted with Le Corbusier, Frank Lloyd Wright, the Bauhaus, the International Style, Postmodern innovators from Phillip Johnson and Frank Gehry, and recent artists who cross boundaries between art and architecture, such as Olalekan Jeyifous and Patricia Johanson. Aesthetic tropes are examined and evaluated, including realism, disorder, fragmentation, the sublime, irony, pastiche, surface, depth, ruins, and everydayness. As an interdisciplinary course bridging Art History and Philosophy students are also introduced to theorists of art, culture, and architecture who have not only observed these movements but in some cases shaped them. They range from Charles Baudelaire and Freidrich Nietzsche to Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Frederic Jameson, Jean Baudrillard, Jean Francois Lyotard, Robert Venturi, Charles Jencks, and others. General Education: C. 3 credits

PH-351 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a philosophical frame of reference. 3 credits

PH-351W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a philosophical frame of reference. 3 credits

PH-352 - Approaches to Global Justice

In this course, students become familiar with theories of global justice inspired by John Stuart Mill, Immanuel Kant, John Rawls, and others. In addition to classic texts, they read contemporary scholarship in political philosophy, ethics, and economics that engages such issues as global poverty, immigration, inequality, climate change, war, refugees, religious conflict, and nation-state conflict. Students learn to evaluate and apply different approaches to these issues. General Education: C. 3 credits

PH-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

PH-393 - Final Project I

A project-based capstone project consisting of one semester/module of research (PH/RS 393) and one semester/module consisting of writing (PH/RS 394). Both stages of the project must be conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. 3 credits

PH-394 - Final Project II

A project-based capstone project consisting of one semester/module of research (PH/RS 393) and one semester/module consisting of writing (PH/RS 394). Both stages of the project must be conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. 3 credits

Physical Education (PE)

PE-101 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Physical Education frame of reference. 1-3 credits

PE-96DD - Weight Training

This course is designed to give proper instruction to those students interested in the development of strength and general conditioning. Various equipment will be used in the development of a personalized weight-training program for each student. The course also teaches lifetime recreational team activities. .5 credit

PE-96V - Swim to Be Fit I

A course designed to improve body fitness through structural swimming activities. .5 credit

PE-96VV - Swim to Be Fit II

A course utilizing structural swimming activities to increase body fitness and improve movement in the water. Aquatic exercises aimed to lessen body fat and improve physical well being. .5 credit

Physical Science (SC)

SC-105 - Science Topics

This is a non-majors course designed to study and discuss areas of current scientific interest. Topics will vary and may include the environment, health & disease issues, human genetics, biotechnology, and the chemistry or physics of everyday phenomena. Students will gain an understanding of the scientific method along with techniques in data analysis and presentation. General Education: A. 3 credits

SC-108 - Frontiers of Science

This is a non-majors course that introduces general principles of biology though the examination of issues and concerns of current importance to the general public. Topics studied include, but are not limited to, biotechnology, genetic engineering, human health and disease. Through the exploration of highly debatable subjects, students gain an understanding of how the scientific method is applied to resolving questions and unanswered problems. General Education: A. 3 credits.

SC-109 - Ecology in the Field

This is a non-majors course that introduces students to field techniques that investigate the relationship between organisms and their environment. We start with nearby forest habitat and ask what factors contribute to a healthy ecosystem, including water quality, soil type, tree diversity, and invertebrate and amphibian abundance. Once field data has been collected, we return to the lab and analyze and interpret our results. Students working in teams are expected to write a paper and create a presentation explaining our methodology and discussing the implications of our results on biodiversity and forest quality. General Education: A. 3 credits

SC-110 - Human Health and Disease

This course is designed to allow students to gain familiarity with concepts in a select group of topics related to human health and disease. Successful students will develop critical scientific reasoning skills necessary to form educated opinions about contemporary science/health topics. Topics studied include cells, tissues and organs, cancer, genetic disorders, aging and more. Through the exploration of controversial topics, students gain an understanding of how the scientific method is applied to resolve current questions and problems. General Education: A. 3 credits

SC-114 - Nutrition for Health and Fitness: The Science of Wellness

This course provides a comprehensive introduction into the vital role nutrition plays in enhancing one's health and fitness. Throughout the course students will be exposed to current research and literature along with practical activities. Topics studied will include, but are not limited to, the basic principles of nutrition, our energy systems and energy yielding nutrients, vitamins, minerals and body weight loss/gain through proper nutrition and exercise. This course will also provide insight on nutrition for fitness as well as throughout the life cycle. General Education: A. 3 credits

SC-118 - Ecology of Long Island Sound

This is a non-majors course that introduces students to the Biology and Ecology of Long Island Sound (LIS). Topics may include the different habitats found throughout LIS, the organisms found in those habitats, current environmental issues and fundamental marine research approaches. The course may involve field trips to various LIS locations. General Education: A. 3 credits

SC-131 - General Physics I

The study of selected topics, e.g., motion, force, work, energy and thermodynamics, using algebra and trigonometry. Laboratory exercises will illustrate these principles. This course is a requirement for students preparing for teaching certification in Biology or Chemistry. To be taken in conjunction with SC 131L. P: High school physics, algebra or departmental permission. 3 credits

SC-131L - General Physics I Laboratory

This course illustrates selected topics including motion, force, work, energy and thermodynamics, using algebra and trigonometry through hands-on work. To be taken in conjunction with SC 131. 3 hours. 1 credit

SC-132 - General Physics II

The study of the fundamental principles of sound, electricity, magnetism, optics and atomic physics. Laboratory exercises will illustrate these principles. To be taken in conjunction with SC 132L. P: SC 131. 3 credits

SC-132L - General Physics II Laboratory

This course illustrates selected topics including sound, electricity, magnetism, optics and atomic physics through hands-on work. To be taken in conjunction with SC 132. 3 hours. 1 credit

SC-302 - Practicum/Internship

Supervised practical experience in an external setting related to students' interest. P: Permission of Department Chair. 1-6 credits.

SC-327 - Independent Research

Experimental research under the supervision of a member of the Biology or Chemistry faculty. P: Permission of Instructor. 1-4 credits

SC-340 - Advanced Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Biology or Chemistry frame of reference. 3 credits

SC-351 - Senior Science Seminar I

This is a capstone course designed to help Biology and Chemistry seniors integrate the knowledge they have obtained throughout their undergraduate studies and prepare for advancement either to employment or graduate school. Students will find and read primary scientific literature and effectively analyze and communicate research findings, as well as refine a resume and develop effective interview skills. P: Senior status. 1 credit

Political Science (PO)

PO-111 - World Politics

World Politics investigates the origins and structure of contemporary governmental institutions and the different forms that political activity takes in the early 21st century. In this introductory-level course, we will examine how the modern state came to be, how different governments are organized, and what contemporary problems are transforming traditional notions of politics and the role of governments. We will explore defining issues in world politics including, among others, democratization, political economy, governmental design, courts and constitutions, participation, and violence in politics. Case studies of countries will be used to illustrate differing political systems and their relationship to each country's history and culture. General Education: B. 3 credits

PO-112 - American Politics and Government

American Politics and Government examines the institutions, values, and issues that define the American political community. In particular, it will focus on the ideals that continue to animate American political culture-equality, liberty, and democracy-and how these principles are and are not realized in practice. The course also covers the structure of American government, including Congress, the Presidency, the courts, and bureaucracy. General Education: B. 3 credits

PO-115 - Introduction to Urban Studies

Urban Studies examines urban social issues, urban planning strategies, and urban cultural movements. This course introduces to practical, historical, and theoretical approaches to the field of Urban Studies as an interdisciplinary program of study that addresses the way cities shape and are shaped by race and class, inequality, built environments and infrastructures, housing, community services, entrepreneurship, economic development, local governance, and urban art and culture. Applying knowledge of classic and contemporary texts in Urban Studies, students participate in experiential learning activities, including a class project that engages a current problem or project underway in the City of New Haven. Toward completion of the project, students visit sites in the city and meet with government officials, local non-profit directors, and community organizers. General Education: B. 3 credits

PO-230 - State and Local Government

This course looks at the practical workings of government at the local and state level in the United States. Particular attention will be paid to the ways in which Federalism and separation of powers has shaped politics in these areas, as well as the ways in which democracy, social movements, and political parties shape the process and outcomes of state and local government. General Education: B. 3 credits

PO-231 - Constitutional Law

An introduction to the constitutional doctrines and political role of the U.S. Supreme Court, focusing on its evolving constitutional priorities and its response to basic governmental and political problems. The course examines the nature of the Constitution and various theoretical approaches to interpreting it. Special emphasis is given to close textual analysis of various Supreme Court decisions. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-231W - Constitutional Law

An introduction to the constitutional doctrines and political role of the U.S. Supreme Court, focusing on its evolving constitutional priorities and its response to basic governmental and political problems. The course examines the nature of the Constitution and various theoretical approaches to interpreting it. Special emphasis is given to close textual analysis of various Supreme Court decisions. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-251 - Topics in Political Science

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Political Science frame of reference. 3 credits

PO-252 - Topics in Political Science

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Political Science frame of reference. 3 credits

PO-253 - Topics in Political Science

Selected topic studied in-depth within a Political Science frame of reference. 3 credits

PO-253W - Special Topics

A course in any area of Political Science that will focus on a single topic or theme. 3 credits

PO-257 - International Relations

An introduction to the political interaction of nations and non-national actors on the global stage. The course focuses on strategies nations employ in pursuit of national security, economic development, and global influence. Attention is given both to theories of international relations such as realism, idealism, and neo-realism as well as specific case studies. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-273W - Classical Political Theory

An introduction to political philosophy through the writings of major political thinkers of the classical period. The primary focus is a critical analysis of Plato and Aristotle. The course is concerned with the enduring issues of political life: the nature of freedom, the proper relationship of the individual to the state, the nature of justice, the nature and function of law, the rightful use of power, and the relative value of different forms of government. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-274 - Modern Political Theory

An examination of Western political thought through the writings of important modern political theorists: Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Mill, and Marx. A central focus of the course is the nature of liberalism, and the meaning of concepts such as rights, justice, freedom, equality, and democracy. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-303 - Urban Gardens Studio

In this course, students will learn how forces such as public policy, market imperatives, and global logistics affect food production and distribution. What specific challenges to food production, circulation, and consumption, emerge from urbanization and what kind of initiatives and organizations have arisen to address these issues, and ensure adequate food for all. Service learning projects will give students first-hand exposure to the specific ways the New Haven community has worked to address these issues. Paying specific attention to urban agriculture, students will see how many urban farms make use of complex multifunctional urban spaces, forcing us to rethink the urban environment in novel ways. Lastly, the course will examine the connections between cultivated urban spaces and cultural expression and meaning, with specific attention paid to the connection between urban gardening and various diaspora communities that are found in urban environments. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-322W - Politics Through Film

This course focuses on film as a medium for the presentation of political events and ideas and as a means of shaping political opinion. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-325W - Democracy and Its Critics

This course examines the theoretical and practical development of democracy from ancient Athens to the present by reading key thinkers and critics of democracy. Concepts to be addressed include majority rule, representation, participation, democratic citizenship, among others. Authors may include Rousseau, Marx, Dewey, Schmitt, Schumpeter, Dahl, Held, among others. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-329 - Global Social Movements

This course examines various social movements from around the world in order to better understand the underlying dynamics of these powerful driving forces in the contemporary world. The course will investigate central questions such as: Why do social movements emerge? What sustains social movements? Why do some movements succeed where others fail? General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-329W - Global Social Movements

This course examines various social movements from around the world in order to better understand the underlying dynamics of these powerful driving forces in the contemporary world. The course will investigate central questions such as: Why do social movements emerge? What sustains social movements? Why do some movements succeed where others fail? General Education: C. 3 credits.

PO-341 - World Revolution in the Twentieth Century

A study of the major revolutions of the twentieth century with special attention to the theoretical approaches to the nature of revolution. Primary attention will be given to the Mexican Revolution of l9l0, the Russian Revolution of 1917, the Chinese Revolutions of 1911 and 1949, and the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. General Education: C. 3 credits

PO-380 - Internship

Fieldwork experience initiated with permission of the Department Chair. 3-12 credits

PO-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

PO-391 - Political Science Seminar

This course provides the political science major an opportunity for creative research. The goal is to expose students to the various ways of acquiring knowledge of politics and to philosophical problems involved in social inquiry, as well as to train them in the use of the scientific method. This course is required of political science majors and is to be taken either in the junior or senior year. It is open to any junior or senior social science major. 3 credits

Psychology (PY)

PY-111 - Introduction to Psychology

Introduction to the major areas, theories, concepts, and methods of contemporary psychology. Topics may include ways of perceiving, learning, and thinking about the world; emotions; motivation; the relationship between brain events and inner experience; child development and adult personality; self-concept; attitudes toward others and behavior in social situations; stress, coping, and the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders. Special attention will be paid to the application of scientific methods to the study of human cognition and behavior. General Education: B. 3 credits

PY-131 - Development of Art in Childhood

Children naturally begin producing works of art by the preschool years, and their mental growth is mirrored in their art. This course examines the typical developmental sequence of children's art, the meaning of art to the child, and the ways in which art can inform us about children's cognition. Attention also will be paid to the facilitation of artistic development by educators and the use of art in child psychotherapy. P: PY 111. 1.5 credits

PY-132 - Development of Play in Childhood

Play, a universal behavior among young mammals, not only represents their abundant energy but also serves as an important form of enactive learning. Children's play helps them to master and make sense of the physical and social worlds in which they live. Human play takes many forms, some of which emerge in a developmental sequence. This course reviews the major forms of play at different stages of childhood as well as their significance for understanding the child. Attention also will be paid to the facilitation of desirable play behavior and the use of play in child psychotherapy. P: PY 111. 1.5 credits

PY-133 - Reasoning and Numeracy in Childhood

Examines the development of reasoning in childhood, from its beginnings in infancy through the maturation of abstract thinking in adolescence. The classic stage model proposed by Jean Piaget and his followers will be evaluated in terms of more recent research that has led to revisions in our understanding of children's cognitive abilities. Special attention will be paid to the development of quantitative reasoning, beginning with basic numeracy and progressing to more complex operations. Methods of facilitating reasoning and mathematical competence also will be considered. P: PY 111. 1.5 credits

PY-134 - Attachment and Relationships in Childhood

Humans, like other mammals, form attachment bonds with important caregivers early in life. As social beings, humans also may generalize lessons learned from our interactions with caregivers to other relationships, such as friendships with peers. This course examines the considerable body of theory and research concerning attachment in childhood as well as the development of children's friendships and other important relationships. Attention also will be paid to the clinical manifestations of attachment disorders. P: PY 111. 1.5 credits

PY-135 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a psychological frame of reference. 1.5 credits

PY-205 - Ethnic and Gender Issues in Mental Health

This course will explore the perception and interaction of cultural relevance and gender sensitivity as a necessity in case management and clinical work. Students will explore the mental health needs and norms of several ethnic groups in the United States including European, Native-American, African American, Latino/Latina, Asian American, Jewish and Arab American clients. Students will also gain an understanding of the role ethnicity and gender has in mental health and substance abuse treatment. In addition, they will examine the impact of oppression on women and other minority groups. Students will design a cultural collage and research their own ethnic, cultural and gender norms to gain a better understanding of themselves in relation to others. General Education: C. 3 credits

PY-210 - Behavior Modification

Application of learning principles to human behavior and its modification in clinical settings, business environments, the classroom, and everyday life. Examines methods of determining the triggers for problem behaviors and the role of rewards. A number of approaches to changing old behaviors and establishing new behaviors will be discussed, such as token economies, self-monitoring, contracts, cognitive-behavioral techniques, shaping, differential reinforcement, and extinction. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-211 - Abnormal Psychology

Psychological functioning is said to be abnormal when it is atypical and causes distress to the individual or to other members of that person's community. Viewed through a medical lens, these behaviors are regarded as signs of psychopathology (mental illness). This course provides a thorough grounding in the psychiatric diagnostic classification system, covering most of the major categories of mental disorder: anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, and more. Theories explaining the various forms of mental disorder, research findings on their social, psychological, and biological correlates, and treatment options are also considered. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-213 - Counseling Techniques

A didactic-experiential course addressing contemporary procedures for counseling clients with emphasis on acquiring interviewing skills and understanding the counselor-client dyad as an effective working relationship. P: PY 111, PY 211. 3 credits

PY-214 - Death and Dying

The study of the theories relating to the process of dying and bereavement. Topics include: factors that influence the needs of patients and survivors; theories of attachment; stages of grief; suicides; and living wills. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-218 - Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

Addresses basic concepts and methods of statistical data analysis as applied in psychology and other social/behavioral sciences, including organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. This course will provide students with a foundation in descriptive and inferential statistics, touching on frequency distributions, probability sampling, and hypothesis testing. Analyses conducted by hand and using SPSS. P: General Education: Math A. 3 credits

PY-222 - Learning

Whenever experience changes our behavior in a lasting way, learning has taken place. Learning includes acquisition of knowledge, mastery of concepts, cultivation of skills, and development of habits. This course surveys what is known about key forms of learning, emphasizing classical conditioning, operant conditioning, observational learning, verbal learning, and information processing models of memory. Major theories that attempt to explain these processes and how these theories are applied to real world concepts, such as education, will be covered. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-229 - Psychology of the Exceptional Child

Not all children develop along 'typical' lines. For some, cognitive and/or social-emotional development differs sharply from what is considered normative. This course concerns the psychology of such children, especially insofar as their differences may produce problems in living (e.g., academic failure or social stigmatization). Assessment and diagnostic procedures (e.g., psychological tests) as well as intervention strategies (e.g., behavior modification) will be covered. Specific language and academic skills disorders, autistic-spectrum disorders, mental retardation, selected medical conditions, disruptive behavior disorders, 'internalizing' disorders (e.g., separation anxiety), and the consequences of neglect and abuse will be considered. Some attention also will be paid to the issues raised by giftedness and special talents. In addition to describing the various disorders clinically and phenomenologically, we will try to understand their origins, nature, and developmental implications, and how they can be recognized and effectively addressed in specialized settings (e.g., clinics), in regular classrooms, and in the home. This course includes a fifteen-hour field experience. This course does not fulfill the required special education courses for teacher candidates seeking initial teacher certification in Connecticut. Teacher candidates should consult with the Certification Officer for information about the required special education courses. P: PY 111 and PY 211 or PY 330. 3 credits

PY-232 - Organizational Psychology

Concerns the application of psychological principles in organizational settings. Some topics which will be explored include: decision making, group and team dynamics, leadership, motivation, and stress in the workplace. Students will learn what makes for an effective workforce and how to best encourage it. P: PY 111 or MG 131. 3 credits

PY-234 - Brain and Behavior

The study of the anatomy and physiology of the brain and peripheral nervous system and their relation to behavior. Topics will include the neural basis of sensation, motivation, and learning, and the effects of traumatic brain injury and neurological disorders. P: PY 111 or BI 111. 3 credits

PY-235 - Drug and Alcohol Abuse

An introductory survey covering a variety of issues in the addiction arena, including the psychology of addiction, biological issues, the impact of addiction on families, identification of addictions, and methods of intervention. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-236 - Motivation

An exploration of human and animal motivation and factors influencing the direction and magnitude of behavioral responses. The course considers the roles played by instincts, drives, arousal modulation, and incentives, while emphasizing behavioral and social learning approaches to reinforcement. Both lower-level biological motives (e.g., hunger) and higher-level acquired motives (e.g., achievement) will be covered. The distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic motives and the applied topic of work motivation will receive special attention. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-237 - Cognitive Psychology

This course is the study of how humans think, how we represent and process information in the mind/brain. Topics that may be covered include sensation and perception, attention, the representation of knowledge, memory, the nature and development of expertise, mental imagery, problem solving, creativity, language and reading, and individual differences. The course will have an applied focus where theories of how we represent and process information will be used to help solve real world problems in diverse areas such as education, medicine, sports, and law. Another focus will be to have students develop their understanding of the types of questions that cognitive psychologists ask and how they answer those questions; this will be developed through reading primary literature, in class demonstrations, and individual and/or group experiments and/or presentations. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-239 - Close Relationships

This course examines intimacy and how relationships (romantic, familial, platonic) develop. The theories and research findings reviewed are based on the empirical study of behavior and cognition as they relate to our interpersonal relationships. Topics such as what is love, attraction, communication in relationships, satisfaction, jealousy, and relationship dissolution, will be addressed. Upon completion of this course you should have a better understanding of how relationships work, and how to succeed in them. General Education: C. 3 credits

PY-242 - Educational Psychology

This course is a study of the assumptions about learning and development that underlie various educational practices by acquainting students with different theories in both of these areas. It provides students with opportunities to develop their problem solving skills in the context of education and psychology. Some of the topics the course covers are development and individual differences, learning theories, problem solving, instructional objectives and methods, motivation, behavior management, and assessment. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-248 - Cultural Psychology

This course examines the importance of cultural factors in explaining and understanding human behavior, providing students with a cross-cultural framework to evaluate the relevance of traditionally held beliefs and theories to different cultural groups. Students will explore the role of culture in development, cognition, gender, emotion, language and communication, personality, abnormal psychology, development of self and identity, and interpersonal and intergroup relations. To develop a better understanding of self in relation to the world, students will research their own cultural background and norms in comparison to mainstream society in the United States. Finally, students will develop a deeper, more complex understanding of the nature of culture, its relationship to the psychological processes, and the differences and similarities between cultures in our increasingly globalized world. General Education: C. 3 credits

PY-250 - Community Psychology

A multidisciplinary approach emphasizing the prevention and treatment of psychological problems in a community setting. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-251 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a psychological frame of reference. 1-3 credits

PY-251W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a psychological frame of reference. 1-3 credits

PY-280 - Practicum

A field-based experiential practicum involving approximately 8-10 hours per week on site. Sites may include schools, clinics, community agencies, corporations, or laboratories depending on the student's interest and area of concentration. P: Second semester Junior status, senior status or permission of Department Chair. 3 credits

PY-290 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-3 credits

PY-311 - History and Systems of Psychology

A study of the philosophical and scientific antecedents of contemporary psychology, the major theorists and research methods in the early years of psychological science, and their influence on current developments and controversies in the field. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-312 - Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy involves the treatment of mental illness and/or the facilitation of people's coping with life problems using psychological (as opposed to biomedical) methods. Evidence indicates that a variety of psychotherapeutic approaches can be effective, depending in part on the nature of the presenting problems. This course surveys the principal schools of thought in psychotherapy, including psychodynamic, humanistic, behavioral, and cognitive therapies. P: PY 111, PY 211. 3 credits

PY-321 - Personality

Personality involves the study of the consistent patterning underlying the day-to-day variability in human thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Influential personality theories will be critically evaluated and applied, testing their abilities to cast light on individual differences in self-concept and relational style. P: PY 111. General Education: C. 3 credits

PY-321W - Personality

Personality involves the study of the consistent patterning underlying the day-to-day variability in human thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Influential personality theories will be critically evaluated and applied, testing their abilities to cast light on individual differences in self-concept and relational style. P: PY 111. General Education: C. 3 credits

PY-323 - Social Psychology

The study of individual and group behavior, this course addresses classical and contemporary issues and research on a number of topics, including person perception, social cognition, attitudes and attitude change, conformity, obedience, prejudice, gender, and interpersonal relationships and attraction. P: PY 111. General Education: C. 3 credits

PY-325 - Experimental Methods and Research Design

An introduction to experimental methods and research design in psychological research. Includes hands-on experience with design, implementation of data collection, data coding and analysis, and the interpretation and communication of results. Students will learn and use APA style format in a research paper describing their research findings. P: PY 111, PY 218 and Junior or Senior status. 3 credits

PY-325W - Experimental Methods and Research Design

An introduction to experimental methods and research design in psychological research. Includes hands-on experience with design, implementation of data collection, data coding and analysis, and the interpretation and communication of results. Students will learn and use APA style format in a research paper describing their research findings. P: PY 111, PY 218 and Junior or Senior status. 3 credits

PY-330 - Child Development

An examination of the major theories, issues, and research related to the developing child from conception to puberty, with emphasis on emotional, cognitive, and social development. Current issues, such as the effects of drugs on the fetus, child abuse, and day care centers will be discussed. This course is not required for those who seek initial teacher certification at the middle or secondary level. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-340 - Psychological Assessment

Psychological assessment involves the systematic appraisal of cognitive abilities, personality traits, social attitudes, interests, values, and other characteristics. Methods include interviews, self-report measures, projective techniques, and performance appraisals. This course covers the basic principles of test construction and validation used by psychologists and educational measurement specialists. It also covers the administration, scoring, and interpretation of selected psychological tests along with a critical evaluation of their qualities. P: PY 218 and open only to psychology majors with Senior status. 3 credits

PY-341 - Adolescent Psychology

This course examines the development of the individual during the period of transition from childhood to adulthood, including physical changes, personality development, and the influence of family, school, and culture on adolescents. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-350 - Adulthood and Aging

An overview of adulthood, maturity, and old age from both physical and psychological perspectives. Personal adjustment and psychological changes over the chronology of adult experience will be emphasized. Topics will include family, career, personality continuity and change, sexuality, and the processes of aging, death, and bereavement. P: PY 111. 3 credits

PY-371 - Introduction to Art Therapy

The role of art therapy in the psychotherapeutic process as a diagnostic, developmental, and remedial tool, including the theoretical bases of this modality. P: PY 111 and either PY 211 or PY 321. 3 credits

PY-372 - Theory and Practice of Art Therapy

Continued study of various psychological theories, concepts, and methods of psychotherapeutic art. Focus on actual case materials and workshop experiences. P: PY 111, PY 211, PY 371 and either PY 312 or PY 321. 3 credits

PY-380 - Internship

A field-based experiential internship in the Child Development and Counseling, and Mental Health concentrations requiring a commitment of 16 -24 hours per week to the placement site. P: PY 280 and departmental permission. May, with special permission of the Department Chair, be taken over the course of two semesters. Upon registering for PY 380, students should immediately meet with the Office of Career & Professional Development and Experiential Learning (Rosary Hall). This should be done by the middle of the semester prior to actually beginning the placement. 6-9 credits

PY-391 - Senior Seminar

In-depth study of selected topics in psychology. P: Open only to psychology majors with senior status. 3 credits

Public Administration (MP)

MP-355 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a public administration frame of reference. 3 credits

Public Health (PHS)

PHS-310 - Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the branch of medicine which deals with the incidence, distribution, and control of a disease. In this course, you will learn and apply key concepts of epidemiology to multiple domains of public health. By the end of this course, you'll be able to use epidemiology to better understand, characterize, and promote health at a population level. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: SO 218. 3 credits

PHS-387 - Public Health Studies I: Current Topics and Politics

This course is intended to provide students with a means of evaluating the health impact of political decisions and a broad knowledge base about the practice of Public Health today. Students will explore a range of current topics in public health - including COVID-19, HIV/AIDS, and the obesity epidemic. Students will also look at the impact of US politics on global public health, especially in developing nations. Furthermore, this course will explore key topics such as the WHO's Millennium Development Goals, the disastrous circumstances that can arise when Public Health Policies fail, and the conflict between data and political will that drives so much of Public Health policy decision making. This course culminates in a project in which students must plan a Health Impact Assessment of a current or proposed federal or state policy. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: MG 311, SO 218. 3 credits

PHS-388 - Public Health Studies II: Demographics, Geo-Spatial Mapping, and Qualitative Research

This course provides students with a variety of tools for understanding the impact that disease or other Public Health concerns may have on a population. Students will learn how to design effective surveys, analyze geographic data, and use qualitative information with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding of how events may affect the health of a particular population. This course will also require students to participate in a marathon in order to help them build understanding of how geographic data is used in the practice of Public Health. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). P: MG 311, SO 218, PHS 387. 3 credits

Religion (RS)

RS-217 - Human Rights and Religious Witness in Latin America: a Film Course

The Americas - North, Central, and South - are the product of European colonial conquest of the Western Hemisphere five hundred years ago. This film course explores the consequences of this colonial origin and examines the cycle of oppression and resistance to oppression in Latin America, more specifically, in Mexico and Central America, from the conquest to the contemporary period. Eight films will dramatize the tragic, beautiful, and epic story of Latin America yesterday and today. Students will report on the films and their relationship to the context of globalizing forces of the Spanish conquest, colonialism, Christianity, trade, American hegemony in the western hemisphere, the Cold War, immigration, and human rights. For each of these globalizing forces, we will employ a twofold approach: (a) identify the actions of the colonial or governmental power and (b) describe the reactions of the Church and of the people. Associated with this approach, we will ask two sets of questions: (a) What justification did the colonial powers use to conquer, dominate, and enslave people? Likewise, in the postcolonial era, what justification did the independent governments use to suppress the people? (b) On the other side of the conflicts, what motivated the champions of human rights, who rose up in every age of this history to defend the indigenous peoples and the peasants? Their examples will lead us to a consideration of Liberation Theology. One benefit of this course is the ability to see a continuity of history: the actions of rulers and the reactions of the ruled follow recurring patterns through time. Students will be asked to describe this continuity. The past isn't dead; it isn't even past. (William Faulkner). A question for students to contemplate is this: How is the past living on in the present? General Education: C. 3 credits

RS-221 - World Religions

This course surveys the teachings and practice of five world religions: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Consideration is given to the question of what makes a tradition a "world religion" and to the history of that idea, as well as to the question of what makes a tradition a "religion" at all. In this way, students are invited to explore both the religious dimension of human existence as well as how that dimension has been expressed and studied. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-222 - Religion and Science

Are religion and science complementary, antithetical, or simply unrelated? How one addresses this question carries implications for how one views the world, society, and the self, and for how one conceives and carries out natural, social-political, moral, and theological inquiry. In this course, we survey the relationship between religion and science in a number of traditions, including consideration of debates about the theory of evolution and other matters of contemporary concern. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-223 - Religion and Popular Culture

This course examines the many ways that religion and popular culture intersect today. It begins by examining the origins of the concept of popular culture, its historical developments in the eras of mass media and digital culture, and the rise of Cultural Studies as an intellectual approach to the study of working-class culture, race and racism, gender and sexuality, and the politics of representation. Students then learn about foundational texts and issues in Religious Studies before applying their learning across these two disciplines to such things as sports, hip hop, yoga, graphic novels, film and television, music videos, video games, and social media. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-226 - Catholic Intellectual Tradition

This course invites students to engage and debate the Catholic intellectual tradition from Augustine to the present. Focus is placed on the relationships between faith and reason and between the Church and the world. The course consists of two units. Unit 1 surveys the work of authors from early Christianity to the start of the modern period, including Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, Dante Alighieri, Meister Eckhart, Teresa of Avila, and John of the Cross. Unit 2 is concerned with recent materials, exploring the tension between the Church and "the modern world" from the French Revolution up to the Second Vatican Council in the 1960s and the new spirit of "dialogue" in subsequent years. A wide range of authors is studied, including Jacques Maritain, Dorothy Day, Elizabeth Johnson, Pope Francis, and others. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-240 - Religion and Race

This course explores the role of religion in the civil rights movement from its origins, through its height in the 1950s and 1960s, up through the continued struggle for civil rights in the US today. It consists of three units. Unit 1 focuses on the work of Martin Luther King, Jr. and two fellow travelers, Howard Thurman and Abraham Heschel. Key events in the history of the movement are discussed. Unit 2 turns to the life and work of Malcolm X, including his relationship with the Nation of Islam and powerful public addresses. Unit 3 looks at the work of several figures who came to prominence after "Martin and Malcolm," including James Cone, James Baldwin, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and others. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-242 - The Spiritual Life

What is the spiritual life? How do practitioners of various spiritual and religious traditions live out and develop their spiritual life? The course addresses these questions through two units of study, the latter including a focus on practice and experiential learning. Unit 1 surveys the history of spirituality, including in both Western and Eastern traditions and the work of significant authors, including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Vivekananda, William James, Thomas Merton, and others. Unit 2 considers more recent texts and movements concerned with the spiritual life and students experience spiritual practices first-hand, including mindfulness practice, meditation, and yoga. Where possible local practitioners are invited to share their expertise. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-244 - Religions of Asia

This course explores the major religious and ethical traditions of Asia. It consists of five units. After being introduced to some basic theory and method in the study of religion, students survey of Hinduism, including a reading of the Bhagavad Gita, and consider the major traditions of China: Confucianism and Taoism, including readings of Confucius' Analects and the Tao Te Ching. Finally, they focus on Buddhism, surveying some of the tradition's major teachings and features, focused especially on the practice of meditation and the Zen and Tibetan traditions. The course concludes with a reading of the Dhammapada. The course includes elements of experiential learning where possible and focuses especially on the ethical significance of the teachings and practices of these traditions. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-252 - The Gospels

Reading and discussion, informed by contemporary criticism, of one of the four gospels of the canonical Christian scriptures. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-253 - Selected Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a religious frame of reference. 3 credits

RS-254 - Selected Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a religious frame of reference. 3 credits

RS-275 - History of Christianity

This course surveys the history of Christianity from its origins to the present day. Unit 1 focuses on the early Church up through the Council of Chalcedon in 451, including a reading of the Gospel of Mark. Unit 2 looks at the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, considering the development of the Church in various areas of Europe and the Middle East, the influence of scholasticism, the split between Eastern and Western churches, and the emergence of Christian humanism. Unit 3 turns to the Protestant Reformation and Catholic Counter-Reformation, up to the wars of religion in the seventeenth century. Unit 4 starts from the Enlightenment period, considering the significance for Christian history of the revolutions of that period and the decades following as well as the missionary movements that flourished at the end of the nineteenth century. Unit 5 presents the period from 1914 to the present, considering the impact on Christianity of the World Wars and counterculture movements of the 1960s and concluding by considering the shift of energy in the Church from the West to other parts of the world. Students engage with primary source readings throughout the course. General Education: B.

RS-283 - Religion and Society

This course introduces students to the methods and approaches used by scholars and students of Religious Studies as an academic discipline. Students learn how to think critically about religion by examining it historically, anthropologically, and sociologically. Beginning with 19th-century anthropologists such E. B. Tyler and J. G. Frazer, the course uses primary and secondary readings to chart the development of the discipline through works by Karl Marx, Sigmund Freud, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, William James, Mircea Eliade, Claude Levi-Strauss, Clifford Geertz, and others. Students are introduced to texts by important contemporary authors and to key debates in the field today regarding relationships between religion and such things as global conflict, the rise of fundamentalism, contemporary US culture and politics, and issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-321 - Pentecostalism

One of the fastest-growing New American Religious Movements of the 20th century, Pentecostalism now accounts for much of the recent shift in which a majority of the world's Christians live in the Global South. This course introduces students to Pentecostalism's historical, cultural, and theological roots, including English Methodism and African diasporic spiritualities. It explores complex relations and tensions between Pentecostalism, Evangelicalism, and Christian Fundamentalism, examining beliefs and practices such as speaking in tongues, divine healing, revivalism, and Spirit baptism. Societal issues of race, class, gender, and globalization are investigated as students learn to think critically about religion and society through the lens of Religious Studies, History, and Sociology. General Education: C. 3 credits

RS-323 - Islam and the West

Is the West, especially America, under siege from Islam? Is conflict between America and Islam inevitable? Or is there common ground? What has Islam contributed to the world and to the West? This course provides an overview of the relationship between Islam and the West, including the basics of the religion and civilization of Islam, the relationship of Islam to the West, and considerations concerning Muslims in Western countries, including America. The course takes an interdisciplinary approach, combining elements of history, religion, and culture. General Education: C. 3 credits

RS-351 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a religious frame of reference. 3 credits

RS-351W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a religious frame of reference. 3 credits

RS-352 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a religious frame of reference. 3 credits

RS-352W - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a religious frame of reference. 3 credits

RS-353 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a religious frame of reference. 3 credits

RS-373 - The Question of God in Modern World

A historical study of the impact of the "Modern Revolution" on Christian belief in the West, and an examination of the pluralistic landscape of belief in contemporary Postmodern culture. P: Sophomore standing or permission of the instructor. General Education: B. 3 credits

RS-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

RS-393 - Final Project I

A project-based capstone project consisting of one semester/module of research (PH/RS 393) and one semester/module consisting of writing (PH/RS 394). Both stages of the project must be conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. 3 credits

RS-394 - Final Project II

A project-based capstone project consisting of one semester/module of research (PH/RS 393) and one semester/module consisting of writing (PH/RS 394). Both stages of the project must be conducted under the supervision of a faculty member in the department. 3 credits

Sociology (SO)

SO-111 - Introduction to Sociology

This course invites you to see the world through the sociological imagination. We will examine culture, social structure, race, class and gender inequality, social institutions and socialization from a sociological perspective. General Education: B. 3 credits

SO-121 - Contemporary Social Problems

This course focuses on how social institutions and social organization generate problems for people and for society. Particular attention will be paid to political and economic inequalities, health and illness, education, the environment, and the criminal justice system. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-121W - Contemporary Social Problems

This course focuses on how social institutions and social organization generate problems for people and for society. Particular attention will be paid to political and economic inequalities, health and illness, education, the environment, and the criminal justice system. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-212 - Social Work: History and Practice

This course reviews the history of Social Work in the United States, and examines the practice settings of social work as a profession: case work, group work, community organization and advocacy, and policy and planning. Includes the study of the values and assumptions of social work with an eye towards problem-solving applications with specific populations, as well as social welfare policy critique. 3 credits

SO-213 - Social Work: Populations and Policies

An examination of the populations and policies that are the current focus of Social Work in the United States. We will further explore the special needs of specific populations such as families, youth, the elderly, and the poor, with a focus on how social inequalities create challenges for people that Social Workers must mitigate through social welfare policy and practice. Establishing a knowledge base as well as effective communication techniques will be stressed. 3 credits

SO-217 - Human Rights and Religious Witness in Latin America: a Film Course

The Americas - North, Central, and South - are the product of European colonial conquest of the Western Hemisphere five hundred years ago. This film course explores the consequences of this colonial origin and examines the cycle of oppression and resistance to oppression in Latin America, more specifically, in Mexico and Central America, from the conquest to the contemporary period. Eight films will dramatize the tragic, beautiful, and epic story of Latin America yesterday and today. Students will report on the films and their relationship to the context of globalizing forces of the Spanish conquest, colonialism, Christianity, trade, American hegemony in the western hemisphere, the Cold War, immigration, and human rights. For each of these globalizing forces, we will employ a twofold approach: (a) identify the actions of the colonial or governmental power and (b) describe the reactions of the Church and of the people. Associated with this approach, we will ask two sets of questions: (a) What justification did the colonial powers use to conquer, dominate, and enslave people? Likewise, in the postcolonial era, what justification did the independent governments use to suppress the people? (b) On the other side of the conflicts, what motivated the champions of human rights, who rose up in every age of this history to defend the indigenous peoples and the peasants? Their examples will lead us to a consideration of Liberation Theology. One benefit of this course is the ability to see a continuity of history: the actions of rulers and the reactions of the ruled follow recurring patterns through time. Students will be asked to describe this continuity. The past isn't dead; it isn't even past. (William Faulkner). A question for students to contemplate is this: How is the past living on in the present? General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-218 - Statistics for Behavioral Sciences

Addresses basic concepts and methods of statistical data analysis as applied in psychology and other social/behavioral sciences, including organizing, analyzing, and interpreting data. This course will provide students with a foundation in descriptive and inferential statistics, touching on frequency distributions, probability sampling, and hypothesis testing. Analyses conducted by hand and using SPSS. P: General Education: Math A. 3 credits

SO-219 - Research Methods

This course is a "hands on" approach to research in which the student will learn to design and carry out field observations, experiments, content analyses, or surveys. 3 credits

SO-220 - Sociology of Communications

This course focuses on mass media representations of gender, race, class, and culture. Students will critically engage all forms of mass media from the traditional to new technologies to examine the effect media has on their lives, ways in which opinions are formed and how culture is shaped. 3 credits

SO-220W - Sociology of Communications

This course focuses on mass media representations of gender, race, class, and culture. Students will critically engage all forms of mass media from the traditional to new technologies to examine the effect media has on their lives, ways in which opinions are formed and how culture is shaped. 3 credits

SO-224 - Sociology of Education

This course will provide a systematic analysis of the institution of Education in society, with special attention devoted to access to education and class structure, taking into account race, religion, gender, and disability. 3 credits

SO-225 - Sociology of Sport

This course will provide a systematic analysis of sport in North America, with special attention devoted to the interrelationships between sport, social institutions, social processes, and the critical analysis of sport in contemporary society. 3 credits

SO-230 - Technology, Society & the Individual

A consideration of 20th century technological change with particular interest in its impact on individuals, families, work and social organizations. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-231 - Deviance and Criminology

An examination of the social construction of the categories of "crime" and "deviance" with a focus on data and theories used in Sociology and Criminal Justice Studies. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

SO-232 - Juvenile Delinquency

Investigation of delinquency as a social category, including theories of construction and causation, patterns of delinquency, and the working of the juvenile justice system. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

SO-233 - Corrections

Examination of philosophy, theory, and practice of criminal punishment and of the processes which characterize arrest, prosecution, trial, and sentencing. Formal and informal operation of law enforcement agencies are studied, with special attention to patterns of differential treatment accorded different social and economic groups. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

SO-235 - Drug and Alcohol Abuse

An introductory survey covering a variety of issues in the addiction arena, including the social construction of addiction, social psychological and biological issues, the impact of addiction on families, identification of addictions, and methods of intervention. P: SO 111. 3 credits

SO-241 - Urban Sociology

This course examines the effects of the urban environment on social institutions and populations and explores the modern crises of urban living with an eye towards understanding how to make cities livable, sustainable, and equitable. P: SO 111. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-242 - Race, Ethnicity and Racism

This course examines the positions of race and ethnic groups in the status hierarchy of the United States, and teaches a critical perspective on the economic, political, and social oppression of subordinate groups in unequal social systems. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-242W - Race, Ethnicity and Racism

This course examines the positions of race and ethnic groups in the status hierarchy of the United States, and teaches a critical perspective on the economic, political, and social oppression of subordinate groups in unequal social systems. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-242W_22 - Minorities and Multicultural Diversity

This course examines the positions of race and ethnic groups in the status hierarchy of the United States, and teaches a critical perspective on the economic, political, and social oppression of subordinate groups in unequal social systems. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-245 - Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Women's and Gender Studies. It explores the social and cultural meanings of gender in society and familiarizes students with key issues, questions and debates in the field. General Education: C. 3 credits.

SO-246 - Introduction to African American Studies

This course is an introduction to the study of people of African descent in the United States. We will explore why people of African descent have occupied an oppressed position in the US and globally, and how they have resisted this oppression through culture and the creation of social change. We will examine key historical periods in African American history, with a concern for how race, gender, and class shape the lives of people of African descent, and how Black struggles for citizenship shape the ongoing development of democracy in the US and globally. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-247 - Introduction to Hispanic & Latinx Studies

This course is an introduction to Hispanic and Latinx Studies in the United States. The course investigates the historical, socio-economic conditions and experiences of Latinx with particular attention to structural inequalities, identity construction and migration. General Education: C. 3 credits

SO-255 - Special Topics

Selected topic studied in-depth within a sociological frame of reference. 3 credits

SO-310 - Sociology of Law and Social Control

This course explores the social processes of law and social control in the social context of the United States. Discusses major theories of law and considers the role of law as both a cause and effect of social change. P: CJ 111 or SO 111. 3 credits

SO-371 - Classical Sociological Theory

We will examine the theories of Marx, Weber, Durkheim, DuBois, Addams and other important founders of the sociological discipline and perspective. P: Junior or Senior status. 3 credits

SO-372 - Contemporary Sociological Theory

This course familiarizes students with contemporary developments in social thought that influence sociological research in the current period. Draws connections to classical theory and offers an overview of the main outlines of recent sociological theorizing. P: Junior or Senior status. 3 credits

SO-373 - Sociological Theory

An exploration of social theory as a set of organizing logics for asking and answering questions about social interaction and institutions. The course will explore the underlying conceptual framework of sociology past and present in order to understand that what sociologists know is shaped by how they know it. Focus on theories of social structure and inequality, micro and macro theories, and the socio-historical context of theory production. P: Junior or Senior status. 3 credits

SO-374 - Qualitative Methods

This course will examine strategies for gathering and analyzing qualitative data using approaches such as participant observation, content analysis, focus groups, and interviews. The focus of the course will be on understanding what types of questions are best answered through qualitative research methods, and will highlight how social theory is tested and applied through social research. P: SO 373. 3 credits

SO-380 - Internship

Fieldwork experience. P: SO 111 plus a minimum of 15 hours in Sociology and Senior status. 3-9 credits

SO-390 - Independent Study

In this course, the student will, under the supervision of the department chair/program director, research and produce an integrative culminating project that draws together various aspects of the student's course of study. This project will require the student not only to engage new academic research and material, but the student must also draw deliberately upon learning done in previous classes in the major to support and develop the project. By the end of the semester, the project should be a clear expression of, and culminating investigation into the set of questions or themes that formed the basis of the major course of study. 1-12 credits

SO-391 - Senior Seminar

Consideration of a social problem with an eye to utilizing the "sociological imagination" and skills gained through the prior major courses, both required and elected. This course should be a culminating experience for those who have chosen this major, resulting in a heightened awareness of the sociological perspective. P: Senior status and Sociology or Social Science major. 3 credits

Sports Management (SM)

SM-140 - Introduction to Sport Management

This course explores the global nature, historical aspects, trends as well as the role of the sports industry in society. Topics include, but are not limited to, organizational structure, management, public relations, marketing, financial/economic, intercollegiate athletics, legal and ethical principles of sport administration and management. 3 credits

SM-143 - Introduction to Esports Management

This course will introduce students to the history of competitive gaming and will explore its ecosystem. Since esports is one of the fastest growing industries, attracting 450 million viewers and generating over $1 billion in revenue in 2020, students will get firsthand experience in analyzing it. Students will also navigate esports leagues, teams, players, publishers, tournament operators, media and affiliate organizations. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

SM-202 - Sports Marketing & Promotion

The business of sport is experiencing rapid growth all over the world, especially in America. Sports marketing and sports media are intrinsically linked in American culture. Sports Marketing and Promotion will explore a variety of topics including: Why are sports more popular today than ever before? Why have sports on a professional and collegiate level become "big business"? How does one construct a marketing plan for a professional or collegiate team? How can solid promotion of athletes, organizations, and events leverage the success of sports around the world? This course will focus on advertising and promotion as well as other marketing functions involved in the multi-billion-dollar sports industry. In addition to readings, case studies, and regular assignments, students will prepare a marketing plan for a professional or collegiate athletic team or program. 3 credits

SM-203 - Sports Information & Media

Modern sports and mass media are intrinsically linked. Whether it is a major or minor league team, a collegiate athletic program, or even high school athletics, sports media and the ability to communicate with fans and sponsors can be an integral part of the success of teams and programs. Increasingly, media outlets are presenting amateur, professional, and collegiate sports contests live, or reporting on the results of the contests on a regular basis. Sports Information and Media prepares students to work in different aspects of the sports communications industry, giving students an introduction to sports information and media relations as well as sports broadcasting. In this course, there will be an emphasis on developing skills essential for sports communication professionals, including writing and interviewing, handling media interactions across platforms, social media and other technology, and the introduction of new media into the sports industry. 3 credits

SM-207 - Convention, Event and Trade Show Planning

This course explains the importance of one of the major ways in which games are marketed to consumers and that is the convention. Shows like the Tokyo Game Show, PAX and E3 attract audiences ranging from 60,000 - 300,000 and serve as one of the best opportunities for game studios to generate excitement and favorable word-of-mouth for upcoming projects. Successfully executing a company presence at one of these shows requires a working understanding of budgeting, goal-setting, demo creation, logistics, staffing, merchandising, and ROI evaluation, all topics covered in this course. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

SM-232 - Distribution of Games: The Role of the Publisher

This course explains the role of a publisher in game distribution and details the various channels by which a game can be distributed. The role of a publisher in the games industry is to ensure that a game can get in front of its audience successfully. To do that, a publisher must consider a variety of distribution strategies and channels and this course helps guide students through that. This online class has optional live sessions. This course is offered through the Lower Cost Models for Independent College Consortium (LCMC). 3 credits

SM-301 - Ethics in Sport Management

This course examines major ethical theories and their relation to the development of personal and professional ethics in sport and recreational management. The course is designed to develop a theoretical framework that will lead to a moral course of action and personal philosophy needed to meet the challenges and issues of modern athletics. The application of ethical decision making and problem solving in sport and recreation will be explored. An integrative study of current industry and ethical issues facing sport leaders. P: MG 131 or SM 140. 3 credits

SM-302 - Legal Aspects of Sport Management

This course explores the legal principles of the sport industry and provides a basic knowledge of the legal statutes that relate to various dimensions of sport business. It includes legal principles that affect the prudent performance of all those involved in sporting events and will look at federal legal legislation as it affects program development. Major focus is on a review of judicial opinions in the areas of tort liability (risk management), agency and contract law, labor and employment law and antitrust issues. Topics to be addressed include right to participate, liability for injuries, legal status of sports organizations, risk management, assertion of legal rights, and crisis management. Other areas of sport industry law to be covered are contracts, negligence, gender equity, sport labor relations, and selected current issues. P: MG 131 or SM 140. 3 credits

SM-303 - Sport Venue and Event Management

This course examines the principles and fundamentals of managing and financing sport, recreational, and entertainment venues. Course content focuses on knowledge and skills necessary to develop, design and manage sports, recreation and health/fitness facilities. Students will gain an understanding of planning, implementation, and evaluation of sport events in addition to the design, maintenance, and full utilization of athletic facilities. Principles for effective management of sport events and facilities in both human and physical resources are stressed. P: MG 131 or SM 140. 3 credits

SM-304 - Sport Finance

This course examines the financial management and analysis of the sports industry as it pertains to different aspects of sports, including player compensation, labor relations, facility development, broadcast rights, and competitive structure employed in managerial decision making in amateur and professional sports. Focus is on understanding the developing and management of budgets and financial strategies, including debt service, ticket and concession sales, corporate sponsorship and licensed sport merchandise. Examines financial challenges related to current and future sources of revenue for the sport enterprise. P: BE 161, MG 131, SM 140. 3 credits.

SM-381 - Sport Management Internship

This is a field based course in which students gain on-site employment experience in the Sport Management field for 120 contact hours per 3 credits. The student is responsible for maintaining an integrative journal and completing other academic requirements. A student may repeat this course only once, and the second internship must be in a different place of employment. P: 12 credits in the Business Administration, Management and Sport Management Department plus junior or senior standing. 3-12 credits